Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

Leadership Development Project Team-Adzope in Adzopé, Côte d'Ivoire. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Gathering and analyzing data, and using that data for decision making, remain essential to delivering health services that meet the needs of the population.  In collaboration with its partners in the MEASURE Evaluation Phase III (MEval-III) project led by the University of North Carolina, MSH provides the leadership and organization development support necessary for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) teams world-wide to develop and sustain strong M&E systems. MEval-III's recently released mid-project report highlights examples of how MEval–III has supported monitoring and

At public referral hospitals in Kenya, the development of operating plans typically involves just three people: the hospital medical superintendent, the hospital administrative officer, and the health records officer. Together this small team sets the upcoming quarter’s spending priorities for the entire hospital based on revenues and fees collected in the prior quarter. Scrambling to address the most urgent needs of the immediate future with limited and quickly evaporating funds hampers the realization of a coherent, long-term vision for the hospital.

The five-year Leadership, Management and Sustainability (LMS) Program, awarded to Management Sciences for Health in August 2005 by the US Agency for International Development's Office of Population and Reproductive Health concluded this month. One of the LMS Program's key achievements was demonstrating the link between improved leadership, management and governance, and improved health services. The Final Report released today, documents LMS Program results in five key areas: (1) impact on service delivery programs; (2) results in good governance; (3) mainstreaming and scale up of th

Nurse speaking sign language with patient in Aswan, EgyptIn many developing countries where resources are scarce, patients must struggle to get their health care needs met, whether seeing a doctor, obtaining medicines, or arranging for lab tests.

Please visit the MSH blog for regular updates from the field.

Judith SanonA conversation with Judith Sanon, the manager of family planning commodities for Haiti’s Directorate of Family Health, on the importance of leadership in post-earthquake Haiti. Ms. Sanon has been working with Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH) U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability Project (LMS) for the past two years.What does the term “leadership” mean to you?At the Ministry of Public Health in Haiti, leadership is a strategy in place for us to help others do well and do better.

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world, with 990 deaths per 100,000 live births. Health workers often struggle with poor working conditions and a lack of equipment, drugs and medical supplies. These challenges can lead to frustrated staff focusing on the lack of resources rather than providing quality health care services to the people they serve. Under the U.S.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is pleased to join the Women and Gender Working Group of the Global AIDS Roundtable, in conjunction with the Office of Congresswoman Barbara Lee, for a review and panel discussion on the 2010 International AIDS Conference (IAC) in Vienna. From the Global Fund to USAID to the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, what impact did the conference have on their plans for initiatives and programs?

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is pleased to join the Global Health Council, and PATH, in conjunction with Congressman Russ Carnahan, for a discussion examining the far-reaching multisectoral benefits that stem from successful partnerships.Monday, September 27 1:00-3:00 p.m. Congressional Meeting Room South U.S. Capitol Visitor Center First Street and East Capitol Street, NE Washington, D.C.

President Clinton and Dr. Jonathan D. Quick, MSH President and CEO. {Photo Credit: Clinton Global Initiative.}Photo Credit: Clinton Global Initiative.

CLINTON GLOBAL INITIATIVE: September 20-23, 2010(New York, NY) Management Sciences for Health (MSH) today reported that, after two years and with the support of USAID, it has exceeded its four-year $12.5 million CGI Commitment to Action to introduce and expand Performance-Based Financing (PBF), resulting in dramatically improved quality and delivery of health services for millions of people in Rwanda and Haiti. PBF empowers health managers to allocate resources in a way that rewards meeting health goals.

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