Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

How do you measure the overall health of an organization? Evaluating a person’s health is relatively easy – doctors around the world agree on the basic concepts of physical health, and measurements and standards have been well established for “ideal” height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and other components of health.

Dr. Jide Idris, Lagos State Commissioner for Health (middle), Dr. Barry Smith, MSH Nigeria Country Director (right), and Permanent Secretary, Lagos State Ministry of Health during an interactive session with participants at the ministry headquarters. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Many Nigerians are recognizing that community-based health insurance (CBHI) can increase access to healthcare services. Since 2008, Nigeria’s Lagos State Ministry of Health has been piloting CBHI schemes in Ikosi-Isheri and Ibeju-Lekki local government areas. Enrollment in the CBHI has grown, with more than 16,000 enrollees in Ikosi-Isheri alone. Out-of-pocket healthcare spending by low-income earners has been reduced. According to Lagos State Commissioner for Health Dr. Jide Idris, the pilot communities are responding positively, despite challenges in implementation.

The USAID-funded TB CARE I project, led by KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation (KNCV) in partnership with Management Sciences for Health (MSH), is conducting a pilot study in 28 health facilities in Ethiopia to roll out standard operating procedures (SOPs) for improved tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, treatment, and care.The SOPs include instructions for TB screening, irrespective of the patient’s presenting illness or chief complaint.

Erik Schouten presents data on Option B+ in Malawi. {Photo credit: Sara Holtz/MSH.}Photo credit: Sara Holtz/MSH.

A Conversation with Dr Erik SchoutenWhen considering which public health intervention is best for a country or region for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV, the World Health Organization (WHO) provides a set of guidelines that provide options for various settings.

MSH South AfricaMSH South Africa

More than ten years after gaining independence and holding its first democratic elections, South Africa has made substantial development gains and boasts a growing economy. Despite these achievements, South Africa still faces the largest HIV-positive population in the world. Apartheid is no longer law, yet the health system still retains many inequities from that era. A major challenge for the government of South Africa is improving the accessibility and quality of basic health services.

The Oba (King) of Isanlu, Dr. A.A. Ikuborije, presents Comfort Abu with an award. {Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.}Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.

Until recently, people living with HIV & AIDS in Isanlu Community in Nigeria’s Kogi state had difficulty accessing health services to manage their illnesses. Today things are very different, and much of that is credited to the persistence and perseverance of one woman, Comfort Omadu Abu.Mrs. Abu is the program manager for the Kogi State AIDS Control Program.

Health care staff at Gurei Primary Health Care Center provide patients with drugs after attending their first Leadership Development Program (LDP) session. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Two years ago, the Gurei Primary Health Care Center (PHCC) in Juba, South Sudan was facing a number of operational challenges. In addition to needing a cold storage area for vaccinations, PHCC also had an insufficient number of trained vaccinators and morale was low among the available staff. Within the community they served, PHCC encountered many negative attitudes and incorrect ideas about vaccinations. Residents who brought their children to PHCC for care found that the needed vaccinations were only sporadically available. As a result, the number of children immunized in Juba remained low.

A nurse, trained through the Improving Performance of Nurses (IPN) Project in Egypt. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

It is 2:00 a.m., and Arabey El Sayed has been transported from a village 5km away to the emergency department of Qena General Hospital with severe chest pain. He is a 75 year old farmer, and is married with five grown children. Dr. Ahmad, the physician on duty, is assisted by Abeer and Shimaa, two nurses trained through the Improving Performance of Nurses (IPN) Project. They work together quickly to provide the patient with the necessary emergency care. A nurse administers the ECG, and the patient is diagnosed with myocardial infarction and moved to the Cardiac Care Unit.

The MSH Leadership Development Program (LDP) has reached more than 40 countries over the past ten years since it was first developed in 2002 in Egypt. MSH is sponsoring several shared learning events this year to celebrate LDP’s 10th birthday and support the program as it matures.

Elizabeth Oywer, the registrar of the Nursing Council of Kenya (center), is recognized for completing the Leading High Performing Healthcare Organizations by Dr. Edward Mungai, dean of the Strathmore School of Business in Nairobi, and Joan Mansour, leadership development specialist at Management Sciences for Health. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Four years ago, a national assessment done by the Ministry of Health in Kenya showed that 61% of health managers felt inadequately prepared for their roles due to lack of skills in leadership and health systems management. The assessment report recommended that these gaps be addressed at the pre-service and in-service training levels for health workers and also at the senior management level of the health sector.

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