Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. (MSH) will be soliciting expressions of interest (EOIs) in October 2013 from qualified organizations with capabilities and experience in one or more of four technical areas: Governance and Oversight; Program & Financial Management; Procurement & Supply Management; and Monitoring & Evaluation. The regions of interest for this solicitation may include: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), East Africa, West and Central Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Read the full pre-announcement

 {Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare}Nigerian woman.Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare

Management Sciences for Health’s Nigeria Program to build Leadership and Accountability in Nigeria's Health System (PLAN-Health) supported the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) Health and Human Services Secretariat of the Health Planning, Research and Statistics department to develop an eHealth policy. The eHealth policy is a set of principles and actions to guide implementation of healthcare practices supported by electronic processes and communication, including the use of health applications on mobile phones.

 {Photo credit: MSH} Teens and girls from the community of Shambillo, in Padre Abad District, participate in a workshop on leadership, goal setting, and self esteem.Photo credit: MSH

In the rural Padre Abad district of Peru’s Ucayali region, located in the Amazon Rainforest, teenage girls are nearly twice as likely to have an early pregnancy between ages 15 and 19 than their peers across the country.  

 {Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.}APYIN staff.Photo credit: MSH Nigeria.

The Association for Positive Youth Living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (APYIN) promotes sexual and reproductive health rights of young people in eight Nigerian states. However, the project was experiencing some challenges with streamlining activities, recordkeeping, and assuring the quality of services. As a result, APYIN was underperforming and at risk of losing donor funding.

 {Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman}Dr. Tali Butkap addresses community members during a sensitization meeting in Waru.Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman

Waru is an underserved and hard-to-reach indigenous community in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. Until recently, this community did not have a safe waste disposal system and the majority of homes did not have toilets. Residents often dumped their garbage in open fields and defecated in bushes. This haphazard disposal of human waste and garbage caused Waru’s water sources and environment to become contaminated and, in turn, many residents suffered from diarrhea, cholera, intestinal worms, malaria, and typhoid.

Ummuro Adano

Donors, national governments, civil society, and international partners are grappling with three realities in the domain of HIV and AIDS today: (1) the need to accelerate country ownership and leadership of HIV and AIDS programming; (2) diminishing donor resources; and (3) the need to strengthen local implementing organizations and institutions to sustain the AIDS response in terms of: access to prevention, treatment, care, and support services; addressing stigma, discrimination and human rights abuses that key populations continue to face in many parts of the world; and supporting orphan

 {Photo credit: MSH}Solar panels being installed at the Mukanga General Reference Hospital.Photo credit: MSH

Surgical lamps. Ultrasound machines. Autoclaves. These are essential pieces of equipment in any hospital, and they all run on electricity. In the remote areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo, electricity is a rare commodity. In Mukanga, a rural health zone in Katanga Province, the lack of electrical power was putting sick people at greater risk of death, says Dr. Kasongo Nkulu, Medical Director of Mukanga General Reference Hospital.

ULAT staff discuss the meaning of fatherhood as part of the project's work to build gender awareness. {Photo credit: MSH}

Within the USAID-funded Local Technical Assistance Unit for Health (ULAT) Project in Honduras, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the integration of gender is an important element of our technical assistance.

Justine during a home visit with a father and his son. {Photo credit: MSH}

Justine Mbombo, age 38, lives in a small village called Beya in Kasaï Occidental Province in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with a population of roughly 520 people. There are more than 100 children under age 5 in Justine’s village, and no doctor. Watching children suffer has affected Justine deeply and moved her to become more involved in the health of her community.“In January 2010, we were affected by a measles epidemic that caused the deaths of many children under age 5.

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