Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}Marie Claude Joseph updating commodity management records at the Santé Lumière Health Center in Haiti.Photo credit: MSH staff.

In Haiti, only 31 percent of married women use modern family planning methods. According to the 2012 Demographic and Health Survey (known as the DHS), 52 percent of births in the country are wanted; 21 percent are unwanted; and 27 percent of pregnancies occur sooner than desired. Despite the evident need for family planning services, many facilities in Haiti, including the Santé Lumière Health Center in the Cayes district, have not been able to provide them.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

The Gender Directorate’s mandate is to ensure that gender is mainstreamed throughout the ministry of health in Ethiopia. This is a very difficult and important mandate. Building our capacity is the first step to fulfill this responsibility. We must plan, design, advocate, implement and monitor interventions to mainstream gender, and this requires leadership, knowledge, awareness, and skills.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

In January, the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project hosted a week-long online seminar on LeaderNet, a global online network for health professionals, called “Women in Leadership.” Over the course of three days, 391 men and women from 74 countries joined the internet-only conversation. Participants actively dialogued through a total of 390 conversational postings on topics including the qualities of women’s leadership, obstacles and challenges faced by women leaders, what makes a mentoring program succeed, and more. Women in Leadership Topics

 {Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.}Dorothy Onyango, founder and executive director of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK), talks with MSH about WOFAK, her role as a leader and mentor, and how women are contributing to moving towards an AIDS-free generation.Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.

In Kenya, civil society organizations are on the frontline of health service delivery at the community level. At least 50 percent of healthcare services to communities in Kenya are provided through the nongovernmental sector, which is made up primarily of civil society organizations.

{Photo credit: William Vasquez}Photo credit: William Vasquez

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), under its PEPFAR, USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability/Kenya project, has been appointed as a Continuous Professional Development provider by the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board (KMPDB). Participants in Kenya taking the LMS/Kenya leadership and management related courses—Health Systems Management (HSM) and the Leadership Development Program (LDP)—will now earn credit points for these courses.

 {Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.}Business Planning for Health participants in Zanzibar, June 2013.Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.

Resource mobilization has been a challenge for Tanzania’s National Health Laboratory (NHL).

{Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.}Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.

Gender-related stereotypes, gender profiling, and inequalities between men and women reduce the impact of public health programs. In Nigeria, for example, many women are excluded from making decisions related to their families’ health and from accessing health services in their communities. These exclusions are due to patriarchal norms, often exacerbated by purdah, a religious and social practice that requires women to cover most parts of their bodies and avoid areas frequented by men.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}Nurse Odila Jeune Gens is responsible for family planning services at the Dity health center.Photo credit: MSH staff.

Located in the remote highlands of Haiti’s northwest region of Port-de-Paix, the Dity health center has not always been able to provide adequate family planning services to women in the 21 surrounding communities, despite the obvious need. Maternal and infant mortality is high in the region due to the high number of births, short intervals between pregnancies, and the lack of skilled birth attendants.

 {Photo credit: MSH}A patient receives treatment in a new chemotherapy seat.Photo credit: MSH

The Kenyatta National Hospital Cancer Treatment Center (CTC) is the only health facility in Kenya where the poor can obtain advanced comprehensive treatment for cancer. But given the high demand for services, these patients often experience delays of up to five weeks to see a doctor, resulting in complications and, in some cases, death. This situation is exacerbated by insufficient medical personnel as well as inadequate and in some cases dilapidated equipment.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

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