Leadership, Management & Governance: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH}Attendees pose for a group photo at the launch ceremony for the updated Package of Essential Services.Photo credit: MSH

Even before the 2010 earthquake, Haiti’s public health system struggled to meet the growing demand for services by low-income families, and when disaster struck on January 12, 2010, the already-struggling health services around the country sustained extensive damage. Since then, the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), with support from a range of donors and partners, has been rebuilding to meet its obligation to provide a timely, adequate, and efficient response to the population’s need for health services.

 {Cloteni Coulibaly/MSH}Dr. Fougnique Tuho, Head Doctor, Kaniasso Health CenterCloteni Coulibaly/MSH

"In 2010, I was shocked to meet a child whose whole future was at risk, just for lack of a birth certificate," said Dr. Fougnique Tuho, head doctor of Kaniasso Health Center in northern Côte d'Ivoire. "Without this piece of paper, a child could not even take the entrance examination for sixth grade."

 {Photo credit: Amref Health Africa}Mary Gonera, midwife, led the Mucheke Community Health Center team that improved health service delivery and MNCH indicators in their community in Masvingo, Zimbabwe.Photo credit: Amref Health Africa

Many discussions on incorporating technology in the health field revolve around flashy mHealth tools which improve overall health information systems. Yet smaller scale use of mobile technology can be just as effective in supporting health workers in developing countries to overcome day-to-day challenges and effectively deliver health services, especially in rural communities.

 {Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH}Local NMCP partners deliver mosquito nets in Liberia during the Ebola epidemic.Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH

"When I arrived in Liberia in early 2014,” says Management Sciences for Health's (MSH's) Kwabena Larbi, senior technical advisor with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), “I found there were a lot of malaria partners—the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), Global Fund, international organizations, lots of NGOs… Each was more or less doing their own thing.”

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

Women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. Part of this burden can be attributed to a significant underrepresentation of women in positions of leadership.

 {Photo credit: BLC staff/MSH.}Chief Motleleng of Thabang village shares a book with his four-year-old grandson, Tsoanelo.Photo credit: BLC staff/MSH.

Lesotho is the only independent state in the world that lies entirely above 1,000 meters, and Mokhotlong is the highest of the country’s ten districts. Mokhotlong’s extreme climate and terrain pose significant challenges to children’s nutrition, development, and well-being. Rugged mountains, some impassible by vehicle, and frequent snow cover during the winter months limit access to health services, education, and a balanced diet.

No one wanted to miss this day.

 {Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba}A peer educator mobilizes clients for outreach services in Kawempe, Uganda.Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba

This story was originally published in US Agency for International Development (USAID)'s Frontlines newsletter and also appeared on the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project's website, LMGforHealth.org. The LMG Project is funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) with a consortium of partners.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires}Photo credit: Rui Pires

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), through its USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) Project, trains executive boards in the practices of good governance -- cultivating accountability, engaging stakeholders, setting shared direction, and stewarding resources -- to ultimately improve health outcomes. LMG’s interventions contribute to developing and fine-tuning executive board’s roles and responsibilities. Methodology Links Learning with Results

 {Photo by: MSH Staff}A team from West Hararghe provincial health office discusses professional licensing and accreditation of health facilities.Photo by: MSH Staff

Jemal Mohammed calls governance in the health sector a “matter of life and death.” That’s what drives him to do the work he does.  Jemal has worked in the global health sector for 21 years — more than seven of those at MSH. He has dedicated his career to working on sustainable health interventions that can improve entire health systems.

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