Innovation: Our Impact

MSH Kenya team receives the CICF Award. From left to right: Zoe Hensby (DFID), Spencer Ochieng (MSH Kenya Country Representative), Melissa Wanda Kirowo (FCI Program of MSH), Jamilla Wamwiri (Kenya Progressive Nurses Association), and Boniface Njenga (MSH Country operations Director)

The County Innovation Challenge Fund (CICF) is a five-year program funded by UKAid and implemented by an array of partners to support innovative interventions, products, processes, services, technologies and ideas that reduce maternal and newborn mortality in Kenya.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}South SudanPhoto credit: MSH staff

UNICEF has comissioned MSH to develop a cost modeling tool and methodology that will help countries structure, plan, and finance integrated community health services. UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, is a worldwide leader in promoting and supporting community health services as a key strategy to improve coverage of high-impact maternal, newborn, and child health interventions and reduce health inequities from pregnancy to adolescence and beyond.

{Photo credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH}Photo credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH

It is encouraging how much the world is focused on achieving universal health coverage, and the Sustainable Development Goals only add to that momentum. While much courageous leadership and thoughtful work have led to amazing progress toward UHC in many countries, there is still much to be done for all people have access to the quality, affordable health services they need. 

 {Photo: MSH}Mushombe, one of the babies saved by an HBB-trained staff, with his happy mother in Lemera General Hospital.Photo: MSH

Baby Mushombe entered the world through natural delivery—and immediately struggled to breathe. Respiratory distress could have cost him his life, as it does many infants in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where over 118,000 newborns died in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Fortunately for Mushombe, he was surrounded by a team of midwives and assistants who had mastered Helping Babies Breathe® (HBB)—a resuscitation technique developed for environments with limited resources.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Dagnachew Hailemariam, Head Pharmacist at Bishoftu Hospital.Photo credit: MSH

Dagnachew Hailemariam has worked at Bishoftu General Hospital for six years. The hospital, located 45 km south of Addis Ababa in the town of Bishoftu, is state owned and provides services to between 400 and 500 patients per day. Likewise, the hospital pharmacy receives orders for around 400 to 500 prescriptions per day.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Harivelo, a community health volunteer, counsels a young woman on family planning options after her pregnancy test turned out negative.Photo credit: MSH staff

Vololona Razafimanantsaranirina Harivelo has been a community health volunteer (CHV) in the northeastern Malagasy village of Vohitsoa for more than five years. She has impacted the lives of more than 500 people in her community, providing maternal and child health services, including family planning.

With thousands of people dying in West Africa from the Ebola virus and many more at risk, Liberia’s Accredited Medicine Stores (AMS) and other drug shops continue to help ensure access to pharmaceutical products and services at the community level even as other health facilities have closed down. They also offer the potential to contribute to the control of the lethal disease that has West Africa and the international community on high alert.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

 {Photo credit: Adedayo Adeyemo/MSH}CUBS staff explore the mobile application.Photo credit: Adedayo Adeyemo/MSH

By Obialunamma Onoh, Zipporah Kpamor, Ugboga Adaji,Benjamin Akinmoyeje, Hope Ohiembor, Irene Amadu, Steven Shadrack, and Tokara Kabati  HIV & AIDS impacts millions in sub-Saharan Africa, contributing to a steady growth in the population of orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). In 2008, data from Nigeria’s Federal Ministry of Women Affairs showed that 25 percent of Nigerian children were orphans or considered vulnerable due to unmet needs for nutrition, education, shelter, care, or support.

 {Photo credit: MSH} Teens and girls from the community of Shambillo, in Padre Abad District, participate in a workshop on leadership, goal setting, and self esteem.Photo credit: MSH

In the rural Padre Abad district of Peru’s Ucayali region, located in the Amazon Rainforest, teenage girls are nearly twice as likely to have an early pregnancy between ages 15 and 19 than their peers across the country.  

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