Advocacy: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan}Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan

Dr. Mohammad Khakerah Rashidi is Country Representative of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Afghanistan and Project Director of USAID's Challenge TB in Afghanistan. Rashidi also serves as First Vice Chair of the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) Afghanistan (Global Fund) and is a Senior Lecturer at Zawul Institute of Higher Education. Earlier in his career, Rashidi says he was the “only medical doctor for more than a million people.” He spoke to MSH about its TB work in Afghanistan in the context of a fragile state.

 {Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire}Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store unloading supplies at the docking station.Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire

The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been providing technical assistance since 2005 to Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store, the Pharmacie de la Sante Publique (PSP)—later re-named the Nouvelle PSP (NPSP)—to strengthen the management of products in the health system. SCMS is a project under the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID).

 {Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH}Representatives from the German Enterprise for International Cooperation (GIZ) facilitating a communications workshop with the Ukrainian Center for Socially Dangerous Disease Control, in partnership with LMG-Ukraine.Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH

In November 2013, Ukrainians took to the streets in Kyiv, claiming Maidan Square to protest corruption and to demand the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement, rejected by the now ex-Ukrainian President Yanukovich.  By the beginning of 2014, the situation reached a boiling point and the riots in Kyiv were turning into full-blown urban warfare.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Mpigi STRIDES program, Vaccine Day.Photo credit: Rui Pires

STRIDES for Family Health is wrapping up six years of work in Uganda with “impressive” results in reducing malnutrition and expanding access to and improving the quality of integrated reproductive health, family planning, and child survival services. Achievements between 2009 and 2015 included: reaching 614,338 children under the age of five through nutrition programs, achieving average cure rates for moderate malnutrition of 80 percent in some districts; reaching 921,112 new family planning users and serving 720,674 returning clients;

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

Malnutrition is an underlying cause of 45 percent of deaths in children under the age of five worldwide and leaves 165 million children stunted, compromising cognitive development and physical capabilities. Chronically malnourished children are, on average, nearly 20 percent less literate than those who have a nutritious diet. Thus, malnutrition can shape a society's long-term health, stability, and prosperity.

 {Photo credit: Benjamín Balarezo/MSH}Community leaders and authorities participate in first module of program for Moral Leadership and Community Management.Photo credit: Benjamín Balarezo/MSH

For many communities in Peru, the cultivation of illegal coca for drug trafficking, far from bringing prosperity, has only brought them fear and instability, an eroding community, and caused serious health problems primarily affecting women and children. This dark landscape is now changing for 41 rural communities in the Huanuco and Ucayali regions, who, in 2012 signed an agreement with the Peruvian government to stop growing coca.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Marie Miambokila Mumba and her newborn twins at the Luiza General Referral Hospital in Kasaï Occidental, DRC.Photo credit: MSH

Marie Miambokila Mumba, 38, had a smooth pregnancy and attended all of her scheduled prenatal consultations at the Luiza Tutante Health Center, located in Kasaï Oriental province in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). When Mumba was ready to give birth at the Luiza General Referral Hospital in August 2014, her baby was delivered safely by skilled birth attendant Judith Kambuyi.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Rasoanirina leading a meeting in her village.Photo credit: MSH

Solange Helene Rasoanirina is an active and motivated member of her community. Along with community health volunteers, the 24-year-old has become a reference for health in Masiakakoho, a remote village in southeastern Madagascar’s Tataho commune in Manakara II district.

 {Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators}Jemila Hussein, shown here with her vegetable business; is no longer hiding from her HIV diagnosis.Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators

Jemila Hussein, a 35-year-old widow and mother of six, lives in Namba, Migori Sub County, Kenya. In August 2008, Hussein’s life took a downturn when she tested positive for HIV. Deeply ashamed and fearing the stigma and discrimination associated with HIV, she isolated herself from her community. Her husband’s death had significantly reduced the family income, and Hussein worried about her children’s basic needs and education. She was convinced that she would die and leave them orphaned.

 {Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola}National Malaria Control Program and SIAPS staff doing inventory control during a field visit.Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola

In Angola, the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP)’s 2013 annual report suggests that malaria alone represents 35 percent of all curative treatment demands, 20 percent of hospital admissions, 40 percent of perinatal deaths, and 25 percent of maternal deaths. Universal and continuous availability of recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnosis tests (RDTs) are a critical prerequisite for the effective management of clinical malaria.

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