Advocacy: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

Each year, nearly 300,000 women die from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Approximately 7.6 million children do not live to see their fifth birthday. Most of the major direct causes of maternal and child mortality are preventable. MSH's maternal and child health interventions begin before pregnancy, with integrated family planning and HIV services, and continue through the life of the child.

{Photo credit: MSH}USAID Mikolo recently recognized 10 community health volunteers for completing their training in the use of pregnancy test kits.Photo credit: MSH

4,000 Madagascar Community Health Volunteers Learning to Use Pregnancy Test Kits Although more married women in Madagascar are using modern contraceptives than ever before, their use among this group has stabilized at about 30 percent. In response, the USAID Mikolo Project is training 4,000 community health volunteers (CHVs) how to use pregnancy test kits—a pioneering strategy to help expand family planning in remote areas.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires}Photo credit: Rui Pires

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), through its USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) Project, trains executive boards in the practices of good governance -- cultivating accountability, engaging stakeholders, setting shared direction, and stewarding resources -- to ultimately improve health outcomes. LMG’s interventions contribute to developing and fine-tuning executive board’s roles and responsibilities. Methodology Links Learning with Results

 {Photo by: MSH Staff}A team from West Hararghe provincial health office discusses professional licensing and accreditation of health facilities.Photo by: MSH Staff

Jemal Mohammed calls governance in the health sector a “matter of life and death.” That’s what drives him to do the work he does.  Jemal has worked in the global health sector for 21 years — more than seven of those at MSH. He has dedicated his career to working on sustainable health interventions that can improve entire health systems.

 {Photo: Jawad Jalali/Afghan Eyes}Safiullah Sadiq, community health worker and member of the village health council, was interviewed by the LMG-Afghanistan Project in April 2015.Photo: Jawad Jalali/Afghan Eyes

Safiullah Sadiq, a community health worker from the Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, is one of 14 residents who sits on his village’s health shura. (Shuras are councils that engage local leaders, health care providers, and other community members to improve the community’s health.) Sadiq’s village had identified that low utilization of health services was something that they wanted to address. But, the shura hadn’t understood how it could intervene.

{Photo credit: Katy Doyle}Photo credit: Katy Doyle

One lesson from the recent Ebola crisis in West Africa is that well-managed health systems and well-governed ministries of health can help prevent epidemics. The USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), is helping the West African Health Organization (WAHO) and its member countries improve their governance, which will improve the performance of the region’s health systems, and, ultimately, help prevent future epidemics.

 {Photo credit: Anicia Filda/RHU Gulu}Reproductive Health Uganda's Gulu Branch Health Center, Uganda.Photo credit: Anicia Filda/RHU Gulu

Located in northern Uganda, Reproductive Health Uganda’s (RHU) Gulu Branch Health Center (Gulu) is one of the busiest clinics in the country—serving over 25,000 clients with sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services per month. When demand for SRH services outpaced Gulu’s supply of sexually transmitted infection (STI) drugs and other essential medicines, the clinic could not continue offering essential SRH services to many who needed them, threatening the equitable access to health care in the community.

 {Photo credit: Jamshid Noori/SPS Afghanistan}The GPHF-Minilab™ is fully adapted to resource-limited settings as a tool for pharmaceutical quality improvement.Photo credit: Jamshid Noori/SPS Afghanistan

Twenty-five staff from key pharmaceutical regulation stakeholders in Afghanistan completed a comprehensive training in March and April 2015 on the Global Pharma Health Fund’s GPHF-Minilab™ and its use. The GPHF-Minilab is a portable mobile mini-laboratory kit designed for rapid medicine-quality verification and counterfeit medicine detection in resource-limited environments.

 {Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria}A Minna hospital employee checks a blood sample for HIV.Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria

To increase country ownership and sustainability of laboratory services and programs, the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, led by MSH, identified the need to develop the program leadership and management capacity of local medical laboratory associations in Nigeria. 

 {Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania}Vincent Nanai conducts routine inventory in the Bariadi District pharmacy store.Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania

As a pharmacist with the Bariadi Council Health Management Team in Tanzania’s Lake Zone, Vincent Nanai is responsible for ensuring that all 23 public health facilities supported by the council are stocked with essential commodities. However, prior to Nanai’s training from the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Tibu Homa project, many public health facilities within the Lake Zone frequently ran out of medicines and supplies.

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