Advocacy: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Mariam Nangobi receives treatment for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) at an MSH-supported health facility in eastern Uganda.Photo credit: MSH staff

Mariam Nangobi was first diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in 2010 when she was 12 years old. After completing a full, eight-month course of treatment, she still tested positive for the disease. She was referred to a larger health facility where she stayed for two months, receiving daily injections. Again, after treatment, she continued to test positive for TB and missed a year of school. Health workers eventually diagnosed her with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) -- a strain of TB that cannot be treated with the two most powerful first-line medicines.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}A community health worker brings sputum samples she collected during home visits for testing at a laboratory.Photo credit: MSH staff.

Solange Bitondo coughed for a year, but never sought treatment from the Kinkindi health center less than a kilometer from her home. Instead, the 37-year-old mother of three consulted traditional healers, prayed, and self-medicated with herbs and medicines she found in the market. 

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}A community-based distributor provides a couple with information on family planning in Luiza.Photo credit: MSH staff

Carrying a backpack filled with counseling cards and contraceptives samples, Charlotte Kapinga visits households in the health area of Tutante in Luiza, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), to raise awareness of the importance of family planning.

{The daughter of a community health volunteer with her newborn.} Photo Credit: Sara Holtz/MSHThe daughter of a community health volunteer with her newborn.

   John Yanulis is program director of the USAID Mikolo project, which is reducing maternal, infant and child morbidity and mortality across nine regions in Madagascar. Funded in 2013, the project provides increased access to and improved quality of community-based primary health care services. Through community health volunteers trained in reproductive health and family planning, the project has reached more than 108,000 women who were not previously using family planning methods, and provided over 83,000 couple years protection.

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

Women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. Part of this burden can be attributed to a significant underrepresentation of women in positions of leadership.

 {Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.}Rose Chebet (right) with her twins, her husband, and the linkage facilitator Helen Chelengat (middle).Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.

When Rose Chebet was five months pregnant with twins, she visited Kapchorwa Hospital in Eastern Uganda for a routine antenatal visit. She was devastated to learn that she was HIV positive and she feared her twins would not survive. Health workers referred Chebet, a first-time mother, to an antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic where she began taking medication.

 {Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}In six months, 485 girls in six schools in Mbale District received HIV & AIDS education.Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

When Sylvia Kabuya entered Mbale Progressive Secondary School in eastern Uganda, she knew little about HIV & AIDS, how it was transmitted, or where to get tested. The 16-year-old’s knowledge about the disease was based on conjecture passed among her peers. Less than 40 percent of Ugandan women aged 15 to 24 have comprehensive knowledge about HIV & AIDS, according to the 2013 Uganda Demographic Health Survey.

 {Photo credit: AAM}Manuel, an AAM activist, conducts a sensitization session in Sambizanga district, Luanda.Photo credit: AAM

Angola, like many countries, struggles to provide good sexual and reproductive health (SRH), especially for youth. SRH is a “state of physical, emotional, mental, and social well-being related to sexuality and to the reproductive system” (UNFPA). Good SRH implies that both men and women have a right to decide about their sexual identity, sex life, and if and when to have children. 

 {Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba}A peer educator mobilizes clients for outreach services in Kawempe, Uganda.Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba

This story was originally published in US Agency for International Development (USAID)'s Frontlines newsletter and also appeared on the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project's website, LMGforHealth.org. The LMG Project is funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) with a consortium of partners.

{Photo Credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu}Photo Credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu

In Nigeria in 2014, MSH's PLAN-Health program assisted two state governments in launching the first community-based health insurance plan to cover small-scale business owners, farmers, traders, artisans, and others. PLAN-Health is funded by PEPFAR through USAID and supports Nigeria's goal of increasing coverage from 10 to 30 percent by 2015.

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