Advocacy: Our Impact

 {Photo: MSH}Mushombe, one of the babies saved by an HBB-trained staff, with his happy mother in Lemera General Hospital.Photo: MSH

Baby Mushombe entered the world through natural delivery—and immediately struggled to breathe. Respiratory distress could have cost him his life, as it does many infants in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where over 118,000 newborns died in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Fortunately for Mushombe, he was surrounded by a team of midwives and assistants who had mastered Helping Babies Breathe® (HBB)—a resuscitation technique developed for environments with limited resources.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Dagnachew Hailemariam, Head Pharmacist at Bishoftu Hospital.Photo credit: MSH

Dagnachew Hailemariam has worked at Bishoftu General Hospital for six years. The hospital, located 45 km south of Addis Ababa in the town of Bishoftu, is state owned and provides services to between 400 and 500 patients per day. Likewise, the hospital pharmacy receives orders for around 400 to 500 prescriptions per day.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Harivelo, a community health volunteer, counsels a young woman on family planning options after her pregnancy test turned out negative.Photo credit: MSH staff

Vololona Razafimanantsaranirina Harivelo has been a community health volunteer (CHV) in the northeastern Malagasy village of Vohitsoa for more than five years. She has impacted the lives of more than 500 people in her community, providing maternal and child health services, including family planning.

 {Photo: MSH staff}Nse (on right) with CBHI Board of Trustees Chairman, June 2015Photo: MSH staff

Nse Usoro Odo is a 56-year-old farmer who lives with his wife, a small-scale trader, and their children in Ikot Udo Idem community in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He is also the village town crier and a member of the Village Development Committee (VDC). Members of the VDC are responsible for conveying knowledge and information to community members. Combined earnings for Odo and his wife are around 700 naira or N700 (less than $3.50 USD) per day.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Graciela presents on the experience of her community in the city of Pucallpa.Photo credit: MSH

In rural Peru, persistent machismo—male chauvinism—often limits leadership opportunities for women. But in Monte de los Olivos, a poor rural community in Irazola District in the region of Ucayali, those now driving community development are female.

 {Photo credit: Francis Hajong/MSH}Anika and her mother.Photo credit: Francis Hajong/MSH

Anika was a 22-month-old baby girl living in Belai Chandi Kuthipara in the northern part of Bangladesh when she became sick with fever, cough, and weight loss. She was admitted to the LAMB’s Missionary Hospital in Parbotipur, run by one of the many NGOs where the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Challenge TB project, led by Management Sciences for health (MSH) in Bangladesh, is funding active tuberculosis (TB) case finding among high-risk groups such as children, people living with HIV, and diabetics.

 {Photo credit: Beata Imans/PFSCM}Patients continue to receive their medicines at the counter of the temporary pharmacy.Photo credit: Beata Imans/PFSCM

On the night of December 17, 2014, a fire caused by a short circuit engulfed the pharmacy of the Divo regional hospital, one of the hospitals that provides medical services to more than one million inhabitants of the Loh-Djiboua region of Côte d'Ivoire. Despite the quick response and joint efforts of the neighboring community, $43,000 worth of general medicines and $54,000 worth of antiretrovirals (ARVs) were destroyed. Though the laboratory equipment was recovered, the laboratory was no longer functional as a result of fire damage.

 {Photo Credit: KZN PPSD}The KZN Provincial Pharmaceutical Supply Depot.Photo Credit: KZN PPSD

The KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Provincial Pharmaceutical Supply Depot (PPSD) procures and supplies pharmaceuticals to approximately 550 health facilities in the South African province. In July 2013, it took the PPSD an average of 27 days to process and prepare for dispatch a health facility’s main order for medicine. The PPSD was therefore faced with a pressing question: How can we reduce the time to complete a facility’s main order?

 {Photo: SIAPS Namibia, September 2015}Martin Mandumbwa, PA, dispensing medicines to a patient at Robert Mugabe Clinic in Windhoek, Namibia.Photo: SIAPS Namibia, September 2015

Namibia faces a high burden of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with an estimated 13.1 percent of the adult population living with HIV. To help address this critical national health concern, the Namibian Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) has been receiving technical assistance from the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, with funding from the US President’s Emergency Fund for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), through US Agency for International Development (USAID), and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

{Photo credit: Loren Gomes/SIAPS}Photo credit: Loren Gomes/SIAPS

Curbing the spread of tuberculosis (TB) requires that patients have uninterrupted access to a full course of treatment—frequently a difficult task in developing country settings considering that each regimen includes multiple medicines taken over the span of several months. These may need to be customized based on the type of TB being treated and the patient’s reaction to the prescribed combination. The emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDRTB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDRTB) further complicates the management of TB medicines.

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