Learning & Impact: Our Impact

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

On March 22 and 23, stakeholders from a number of global organizations (NGOs, USAID, Ministries of Health [MOHs], and others) met at a symposium in Washington, DC, to discuss progress and future capabilities of DHIS 2, the open-source web platform that helps governments and organizations collect, manage, and analyze health data.

Zahedul Islam, Country Project Director, SIAPSPhoto Credit: MSH staff

Since September 2011, SIAPS has partnered with Bangladesh’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) and its key Directorates, including the Directorate General of Family Planning (DGFP); the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS), the Directorate General of Drug Administration; and the National Tuberculosis Control Program, to address barriers to access to essential health commodities and strengthen the ability of policy makers, health care providers, and institutions to improve commodity management and ensure the continuous availability of commodities.

Bayobuya Phulu, SIAPS Senior Technical Advisor, explains pharmaceutical service delivery during the SIAPS event.Photo Credit: MSH staff

The SIAPS Program wrapped up its years of work in Namibia with an event in Windhoek on March 14. The program has worked in the country since 2011 to strengthen pharmaceutical management, helping to improve access to quality-assured medicines and related skilled services. SIAPS’ activities focused on enhancing pharmaceutical service delivery, health workforce availability, information systems, financing, leadership, and governance.

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.