Women, Children, and Adolescents' Health: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Baby Rosemary and her parents in Onuk Essien Udim Local Government Area, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.Photo credit: MSH staff

Chief Victor Joseph Ntuen is village head of Onuk, Ukana clan in Essien Udim Local Government Area (LGA) in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He and his wife Emem have five children. Their youngest, 11-month-old Rosemary, fell seriously ill in January. She constantly vomited and had diarrhea for over one week. Baby Rosemary was diagnosed with cholera. Chief Ntuen was devastated at the thought of losing his baby girl to the cholera outbreak ravaging the community. But, they had no money to take Rosemary to the hospital for treatment. He and Emem had just paid their older children’s school fees.

{Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH}Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH

Amy Boldosser-Boesch recalls feeling fortunate to have interned with Family Care International (FCI) when studying for her Master’s in International Affairs at Columbia University. Founded in 1986, FCI was the first international organization dedicated to maternal and reproductive health. Little did she know, in those early days of her career, that she would one day lead the organization.

{Photo: MSH staff}Photo: MSH staff

For the first time in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), 13 life-saving health commodities for mothers and children have been included in the National Health Development Plan (NHDP). These medicines are recommended by the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC).

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Photo credit: Todd Shapera

In Southern Honduras, men in remote communities are learning the value of maternal and reproductive health and family planning.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Justine Ngalula with her mother, Alphonsine, and baby brother Antoine. All three are eating better thanks to the nutrition information Justine learned in school.Photo credit: MSH

Twelve-year-old Justine Ngalula studies more than reading, writing, and arithmetic at her school in Nedekesha health zone. A community health worker trained by the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Integrated Health Program (IHPplus) has been educating teachers and students at Justine’s Catholic school on nutrition, emphasizing the importance of breastfeeding even though the students are young. Optimal breastfeeding, Justine learned, means starting immediately after birth, breastfeeding exclusively for six months, and continuing for  two years.

 {Photo credit: Amref Health Africa}Mary Gonera, midwife, led the Mucheke Community Health Center team that improved health service delivery and MNCH indicators in their community in Masvingo, Zimbabwe.Photo credit: Amref Health Africa

Many discussions on incorporating technology in the health field revolve around flashy mHealth tools which improve overall health information systems. Yet smaller scale use of mobile technology can be just as effective in supporting health workers in developing countries to overcome day-to-day challenges and effectively deliver health services, especially in rural communities.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

 {Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH}Local NMCP partners deliver mosquito nets in Liberia during the Ebola epidemic.Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH

"When I arrived in Liberia in early 2014,” says Management Sciences for Health's (MSH's) Kwabena Larbi, senior technical advisor with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), “I found there were a lot of malaria partners—the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), Global Fund, international organizations, lots of NGOs… Each was more or less doing their own thing.”

 {Photo: MSH}Mushombe, one of the babies saved by an HBB-trained staff, with his happy mother in Lemera General Hospital.Photo: MSH

Baby Mushombe entered the world through natural delivery—and immediately struggled to breathe. Respiratory distress could have cost him his life, as it does many infants in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where over 118,000 newborns died in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. Fortunately for Mushombe, he was surrounded by a team of midwives and assistants who had mastered Helping Babies Breathe® (HBB)—a resuscitation technique developed for environments with limited resources.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Harivelo, a community health volunteer, counsels a young woman on family planning options after her pregnancy test turned out negative.Photo credit: MSH staff

Vololona Razafimanantsaranirina Harivelo has been a community health volunteer (CHV) in the northeastern Malagasy village of Vohitsoa for more than five years. She has impacted the lives of more than 500 people in her community, providing maternal and child health services, including family planning.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version