Women, Children, and Adolescents' Health: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH}Midwife Chirford Semu stands in the labor and delivery room at Bowe Health Center, in Dowa district, Malawi.Photo credit: Rejoice Phiri/MSH

Chirford Semu knows that time is of the essence when complications arise during labor and delivery. He is a midwife at Bowe Health Center in Dowa district, one of the most remote areas in Malawi. This single health center serves an estimated 42,445 people. Of these, 9,762 are women of childbearing age, and there are approximately 2,100 expected births per year in the district. Women who develop birth complications at this facility have to travel 96 kilometers on unpaved roads to reach Dowa District Hospital, the district’s referral facility.

{Photo credit: M4ID}Photo credit: M4ID

Judy Moraa is one of many women who participated in the Lea Mimba Pregnancy Clubs at one of six health facilities in Kakamega County in western Kenya. Lea Mimba, which means “take care of your pregnancy” in Swahili, is a forum where the same health provider and pregnant women come together over the course of a pregnancy, allowing Judy and others to learn essential information, practice self-care, and provide each other with emotional and social support to cope with the stresses of pregnancy.

 {Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A health worker checks malaria commodities at a private clinic in Balaka, Malawi.Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

“Malaria is a very big problem that we are still fighting,” says Dr. Samantha Musasa, Medical Officer for Balaka district, located in Southern Malawi. Indeed, Malaria kills some 435,000 people around the world each year, the majority of them children. In Malawi, the prevalence of malaria among children under five remains dangerously high, at around 23.6%.

{Photo credit: Alanna Savage}Photo credit: Alanna Savage

By Alanna Savage Mist had settled over the morning. I was visiting with staff at Remera-Rukoma District Hospital in the Southern Province of Rwanda. Founded in 1927, the 177-bed hospital serves a population of more than 376,000 and receives patients referred by 11 surrounding health centers.

Story and photos by Aor Ikyaabo Mary John is a 47-year-old mother of two and a hair stylist by profession. She is also one of Nigeria’s mentor mothers — women who provide counseling and essential health education to other HIV-positive mothers in their communities. As a peer and mentor, she teaches these women about how they can prevent their babies from contracting HIV and keep themselves and their families healthy.

MSH collaborated with UNICEF and the Government of Burkina Faso to develop an investment case for community health services to reduce maternal and child mortality and achieve UHC.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) announces the appointment of Amy Boldosser-Boesch to the Global Health Council’s (GHC) board of directors, effective January 1, 2019. Ms. Boldosser-Boesch is a recognized leader with more than two decades of experience in both global and domestic health policy and advocacy, with a focus on women's and adolescents’ health and rights. GHC is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide.

 {Photo credit: Mary Dauda/MSH}After nearly losing her business, Adekeye Dorcas now mentors HIV positive pregnant mothers in her community and trains apprentices in the art of nylon production.Photo credit: Mary Dauda/MSH

A trader skilled in the art of nylon production, Adekeye Dorcas once generated enough income to provide for her family. During a routine visit to the health center in Kwara state, she tested positive for HIV and was immediately offered counseling services and antiretroviral therapy (ART). The growing demands on her time to travel on open clinic days for ART and the cost of transportation began to threaten her family’s financial stability. She knew that adherence to her treatment was key to allowing her to live positively and ensuring that her husband remained HIV negative.

 {Photo credit: Rebecca Weaver/MSH}With the support of IHPplus, midwives are able to apply the helping babies breathe (HBB) approach to resuscitate newborns.Photo credit: Rebecca Weaver/MSH

“I became a nurse because my grandmother was a nurse, my sisters are nurses, and one of my aunts is a nurse,” says Neema Kitima, Head Midwife at Bahira Hospital in Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). While 80% of births in DRC occur at health facilities with a trained assistant, maternal and neonatal mortality rates remain among the highest in the world. The most recent Demographic and Health Survey (2013–2014) showed that maternal deaths account for 35% of all deaths of women 15–49 years old.

A woman learns more about available family planning methods during an outreach clinic visit to Mulanje, Malawi.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

 

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