Women, Children, and Adolescents' Health: Our Impact

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Half of children under the age of five in Madagascar are chronically malnourished: 24% suffer from moderate malnutrition and 26% from severe malnutrition, according to the 2012-2013 Millennium Development Goal Survey. Children in rural areas suffer disproportionately because they are often cut off from resources and information, and are typically far from health centers that support family health. Community health volunteers (CHVs) like Grancie Cicie help close the gap.

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

 {Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH}Liberian Minister of Health, Dr Wilhelmina Jallah, address attendees at the eLMIS launch event.Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH

On May 7, the Liberian Ministry of Health (MOH) and the USAID Collaborative Support for Health (CSH) Program launched a new electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS), the culmination of a year-long effort to help streamline pharmaceutical supply chain management in Liberia.

All children and adolescents should have the opportunity to meet their full potential of physical, mental, and social well-being. The CaTSS OVC Direct Service Support program worked with community leaders and caregivers to re-enroll children in school who had been orphaned or affected by HIV and AIDS.

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

{Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira}Mama Mawa credits the new iCCM site with saving her children's lives.Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira

Married with two children, Mama Mawa lives in Kalamba, a remote village of 900 people in the health zone of Kitutu, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Kalamba experienced four infant deaths from preventable diseases in the three-month period from March 2016 to May 2016. Yet, that was before the installation of an integrated community case management (iCCM) site in the village, under the auspices of the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus).

{Photo credit: Landry Serges Malaba}Students participating in the competition display campaign message of stopping violence against women and girls after visiting the IHPplus exhibition stand.Photo credit: Landry Serges Malaba

The USAID-funded Integrated Health Project, Plus (IHPplus) is helping to bring an important worldwide campaign to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The international campaign, “16 days of activism,” is a global call to action to raise awareness and discuss challenges and solutions for ending all forms of violence against women and girls in all parts of the world.

{Photo Credit: MSH}A nurse in Manika prepares to conduct a group education session on antenatal care, as part of the awareness campaign that helped Brigitte access the care she needed.Photo Credit: MSH

A campaign to promote antenatal care becomes a lifeline for a teenager in need.

MSH Kenya team receives the CICF Award. From left to right: Zoe Hensby (DFID), Spencer Ochieng (MSH Kenya Country Representative), Melissa Wanda Kirowo (FCI Program of MSH), Jamilla Wamwiri (Kenya Progressive Nurses Association), and Boniface Njenga (MSH Country operations Director)

The County Innovation Challenge Fund (CICF) is a five-year program funded by UKAid and implemented by an array of partners to support innovative interventions, products, processes, services, technologies and ideas that reduce maternal and newborn mortality in Kenya.

{Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

How US Foreign Assistance is Making A Difference Uganda has made great progress in controlling the HIV epidemic and increasing access to critical HIV and health services in recent years. Under the Government of Uganda’s leadership and with the support of development partners, such as MSH, Uganda has reached the second of UNAIDS global 90-90-90 goals: 90% of people living with HIV who know their status are on treatment. 

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