FCI Program of MSH: Our Impact

A student from the center for educational activities of Sévaré reads of poem about female genital mutilation.

I do not agree with cutting I didn’t choose to be born a woman So why should I suffer By this removal that I have to endure?   On International Youth Day, communities around the globe will call for – and create – safe spaces for youth to express themselves, influence decision making, seek confidential care and information, and call out violations of their human rights. This year, youth highlighted the urgency of ending gender-based violence, female genital mutilation (FGM), and child marriage in a very public space in central Mali.

{Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo}Survivor and subject of story.Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo

Originally published on Rights & Realities blog The FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health, with support from the Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) Humanitarian Sub-cluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages in Mopti to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. This is her account as told to Adama Sanogo/FCI Program of MSH.

{Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin}Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin

The Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality working group has written a letter to the editor of The Lancet, which was published in the February 18 edition of the journal. Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Senior Director of the FCI Program of MSH, represents MSH in the working group and co-wrote the letter.

{Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH}Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH

Amy Boldosser-Boesch recalls feeling fortunate to have interned with Family Care International (FCI) when studying for her Master’s in International Affairs at Columbia University. Founded in 1986, FCI was the first international organization dedicated to maternal and reproductive health. Little did she know, in those early days of her career, that she would one day lead the organization.

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