USAID Mikolo: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: MSH}Community members discuss plague response.Photo Credit: MSH

Bubonic plague is endemic in Madagascar. Typically, the country experiences 400 to 600 cases of the disease each year. However, in 2017 the plague also took the pneumonic form. Between August 1 and November 26 there were 2,417 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases of plague, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). More than three-quarters of the cases were clinically classified as pneumonic.

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina}Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

The entire population of Madagascar is at risk for malaria, and severe malaria is among the top five causes of death in the country, especially among young children, for whom the disease is a major killer of Malagasy children under five years of age. In this age group the national mortality rate is 7 percent, though this rate varies throughout Madagascar’s 22 regions; ranging from less than 1 percent in the central highlands to almost 11 percent in the coastal regions.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Harivelo, a community health volunteer, counsels a young woman on family planning options after her pregnancy test turned out negative.Photo credit: MSH staff

Vololona Razafimanantsaranirina Harivelo has been a community health volunteer (CHV) in the northeastern Malagasy village of Vohitsoa for more than five years. She has impacted the lives of more than 500 people in her community, providing maternal and child health services, including family planning.

{Photo credit: Sara Holtz}Photo credit: Sara Holtz

A recent outbreak has prompted the USAID Mikolo Project, led by MSH, to actively engage in the global fight to eradicate polio in Madagascar. Eight new cases of acute flaccid paralysis, the most common sign of acute polio, were reported between April and May of this year.

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