Ghana: Our Impact

 {Graphic: African Strategies for Health}Officials from nine African countries convened in Ghana to find solutions to common challenges of attaining universal health coverage (UHC) with sustainability and improved quality of care.Graphic: African Strategies for Health

by African Strategies for Health The goals of universal health coverage (UHC) can only be delivered when access to health services and financial risk protection are equitably addressed.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

Most African countries are slowly moving toward achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to provide access to appropriate health care services for all at an affordable cost. Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), “Health for All: The Campaign for Universal Health Coverage (UHC)” will support existing government initiatives towards universal health coverage and equitable health reform in four African nations: Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Ghana.

Dr. Eliud Wandwalo. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

MSH works with international, national, and local partners to strengthen the capacity of health systems, national tuberculosis (TB) programs, and health managers to improve the lives of those affected by TB and prevent the spread of the disease. MSH participates in several global TB initiatives, including USAID’s Tuberculosis CARE I Program (following the TB CAP program); the STOP TB Partnership; and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

Twenty MSH experts on tuberculosis (TB) from 15 countries showcased the latest global experience and methodologies at the 40th Union Conference on Lung Health, held December 3-7 2009, in Cancun, Mexico.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

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