Supply Chain Management System: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Beata Imans/PFSCM}Patients continue to receive their medicines at the counter of the temporary pharmacy.Photo credit: Beata Imans/PFSCM

On the night of December 17, 2014, a fire caused by a short circuit engulfed the pharmacy of the Divo regional hospital, one of the hospitals that provides medical services to more than one million inhabitants of the Loh-Djiboua region of Côte d'Ivoire. Despite the quick response and joint efforts of the neighboring community, $43,000 worth of general medicines and $54,000 worth of antiretrovirals (ARVs) were destroyed. Though the laboratory equipment was recovered, the laboratory was no longer functional as a result of fire damage.

 {Photo Credit: KZN PPSD}The KZN Provincial Pharmaceutical Supply Depot.Photo Credit: KZN PPSD

The KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Provincial Pharmaceutical Supply Depot (PPSD) procures and supplies pharmaceuticals to approximately 550 health facilities in the South African province. In July 2013, it took the PPSD an average of 27 days to process and prepare for dispatch a health facility’s main order for medicine. The PPSD was therefore faced with a pressing question: How can we reduce the time to complete a facility’s main order?

 {Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire}Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store unloading supplies at the docking station.Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire

The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been providing technical assistance since 2005 to Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store, the Pharmacie de la Sante Publique (PSP)—later re-named the Nouvelle PSP (NPSP)—to strengthen the management of products in the health system. SCMS is a project under the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID).

 {Photo credit: SCMS}SCMS staff provides technical assistance to head of pharmacy at Hôpital Bernard Mevs in Haiti.Photo credit: SCMS

Hôpital Bernard Mevs is one of 177 sites where the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), a US President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-funded project, delivers lifesaving HIV & AIDS drugs and commodities in Haiti. On any given day, dozens of the more than 1,070 patients currently on antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the hospital wait outside the pharmacy’s door where Rose-Marie Marcelin dispenses their monthly supply of medication.

 {Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.}SCMS leads a national quantification exercise to ensure the availability of lifesaving drugs for nearly 55,000 HIV & AIDS patients.Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.

An estimated 141,000 people live with HIV in Haiti. In support of the Ministry of Public Health and the Population (MSPP)’s continued effort to improve the lives of people living with the virus, the US Government, through the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), collaborates with the National AIDS Program to achieve its objective of having at least 90 percent of the eligible population on antiretroviral treatment (ART) by September 2015.

{Photo credit: PFSCM.}Photo credit: PFSCM.

Since 2006, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been working with Guyana’s Ministry of Health to strengthen the supply chain responsible for delivering life-saving medicines. An integral part of Guyana’s Ministry of Health, the Materials Management Unit (MMU), is responsible for managing, storing, and distributing drugs and health commodities to the country’s public health facilities.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.

A project of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) is led by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) established a local field office in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in early 2013. As one of the most recent additions to the SCMS global portfolio of countries, the local staff of five has sought to scale up and produce results extremely quickly. SCMS’ primary mandate in the DRC is to supply the HIV commodities needed by six PEPFAR implementing partners that are spread across four of the DRC’s eleven provinces. These six implementing partners provide care to some of the most at-need populations within the DRC. They have set ambitious treatment targets and depend on SCMS to deliver the commodities that will allow them to meet those needs. The commodities supplied by SCMS range from antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to antibiotics needed to treat opportunistic infections, lab equipment, supplies and test kits. This year, 22,514 Congolese people will receive treatment with ARVs supplied by SCMS.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

{Photo credit: SCMS}Photo credit: SCMS

The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) case story, “Saving Lives Through Stronger Supply Chains” (PDF), was selected as one of the top five winners of the Procurement for Complex Situations Challenge. The Challenge aims at collecting and disseminating practical experiences with lessons of failure or success from designing and implementing procurement in complex situations. Case stories will be used to empower procurement practitioners with solutions and tools to improve procurement performance in complex situations, fostering the science of delivery.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

HIV and AIDS patients worldwide depend on lifesaving drugs to extend their lives and improve their quality of life. In Ethiopia, where an estimated 2.2 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, access to these lifesaving medicines, particularly for people living outside of the capital city, means depending on an efficient and effective pharmaceutical supply chain to get the medicines to keep them alive.

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