Health Commodities and Services Management: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

HIV testing and counseling is central to HIV and AIDS prevention and control as well as improving the quality of patients’ lives. Individuals learn their HIV status and receive personalized risk-reduction counseling to help prevent acquiring or further transmitting of HIV while those found positive are enrolled for support, care, and treatment. Until 2014, only 46 percent of inpatients at Msambweni Sub-County Hospital in Kwale County were tested for HIV. This changed in 2015 when a team from the hospital set out to increase the number of inpatients tested for HIV.

Dr. Andrew Nyandigisi from the Malaria Control Unit discusses lessons learned in the implementation of DHIS2 with workshop participants. {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

An effective reporting system for health commodities is critical to ensure accountability, enable informed decision making, and provide timely access to information. Using DHIS2 to Manage Data for Malaria Commodities

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Dr. Rafida, a pharmacist at Coast Provincial General Hospital, enters patient information into the ADT pharmacy management software.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

“My wife was the first to discover her status. After giving birth, she started feeling unwell and […] tested positive for HIV,” says Mzee Ahmed*, who later learned his son, Juma, was also HIV positive. “After learning my wife’s status, it took me awhile to get tested but I eventually got the courage to get tested. The test was positive and I was also put on antiretroviral treatment,” explains Ahmed. Six years later, they all remain on their antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimens and visit health facilities regularly to refill their ARV prescriptions.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH}Dr. John Chimumbwa, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) program Chief of Party, speaks at the launch.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH

Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) unveiled a new drug formulary, the first of its kind in Kenya, on September 6, 2013. The formulary consists of a list of all drugs used at KNH and guidelines on prescribing, dispensing, and providing medicine information to patients. 

{Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno}Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno

“Medicine can be poisonous if it is contaminated. It can poison my clients, who will keep returning to the facility. To prevent contamination of the medicines we receive, our facility has invested in proper storage facilities,” says Mr. Andrew Mabele, a clinical officer responsible for screening outpatients, reviewing lab results, and providing HIV and tuberculosis patient follow-up treatment in the Kabichbich Health Centre.

The Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Information and Communication, Dr. Bitange Ndemo. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Monitoring and reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and poor-quality human medicines has gone digital in Kenya. Medical experts and patients can now detect, assess, and report unpleasant reactions to pharmaceutical products in real time to the Pharmacy and Poisons Board’s (PPB) National Pharmacovigilance Centre.

Baby Victor and his mother. {Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya}Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya

Around 11 in the morning, mothers start streaming into the health facility. Baby Victor’s mother has brought him today for a routine immunization, but she’s also concerned about his lack of appetite and high fever. The nurses recommend that one-year-old Victor be tested for malaria.Thanks to a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit, Victor’s test results come back in just half an hour.

Malaria continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries, especially in Sub Saharan Africa. In Kenya, malaria alone accounts for 30% of outpatient admittance and up to 5% of inpatient deaths while 170 million working days are lost annually because of it.In 2004, Kenya changed its malaria treatment policy opting for the use of artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria.

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