Tibu Homa: Our Impact

 {Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania}Vincent Nanai conducts routine inventory in the Bariadi District pharmacy store.Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania

As a pharmacist with the Bariadi Council Health Management Team in Tanzania’s Lake Zone, Vincent Nanai is responsible for ensuring that all 23 public health facilities supported by the council are stocked with essential commodities. However, prior to Nanai’s training from the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Tibu Homa project, many public health facilities within the Lake Zone frequently ran out of medicines and supplies.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Cecilia tracks medication usage to prevent stock-outs of medicines and supplies at the Kiloleli Dispensary, Mwanza, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Cecilia Lunda has wanted to be a nurse since she was a little girl when her mother, a nurse, sparked Lunda's passion for helping people. As she grew up, Lunda studied hard and made her dream come true—she has worked as a nurse at the Kiloleli Dispensary in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania for four years.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Suzanna Tungu, a pharmacy assistant in an outpatient pharmacy at the Shinyanga Regional Hospital in Tanzania. Susanna receives capacity building support and on-the-job training from her supervisor, Luciano Lorde, who was trained by the Tibu Homa project in supply chain management.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Tanzania is among six countries with the highest malaria morbidity and mortality in the world. It is estimated that malaria kills 60,000 to 80,000 of the 10 to 12 million people who fall ill from the disease each year in the country. Children are particularly vulnerable to malaria. Though the overall under-five mortality rate is improving in Tanzania—it declined by 28 percent between 2003 and 2010—it remains high in the Lake Zone at 120 deaths per 1,000 live births, according to the 2010 Tanzania Demographic Health Survey (TDHS).

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