Prevention & Organizational Systems – AIDS Care & Treatment Project: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH Nigeria}Photo credit: MSH Nigeria

Motivated by drastic improvements in record keeping, record storage capacity, and shorter consultation times—all due to the introduction of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system—the Federal Medical Center Gusau, Zamfara has committed to scaling up the EMR system.

 {Okechukwu Onyezue/MSH}Karimu Muazu and her groundnut oil businessOkechukwu Onyezue/MSH

Despite decades of progress and efforts made to improve the status of women and children in Nigeria, inequality and poverty persist. In many households in northern Nigeria, women are the caregivers. However, without a steady source of income, they can barely provide for their families. An orphans and vulnerable children program, organized by the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, implemented by MSH, provides integrated services to such vulnerable households, including HIV-infected and affected households.

 {Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria}A Minna hospital employee checks a blood sample for HIV.Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthoumieu - Niger State, Nigeria

To increase country ownership and sustainability of laboratory services and programs, the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, led by MSH, identified the need to develop the program leadership and management capacity of local medical laboratory associations in Nigeria. 

{Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.}Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.

Gender-related stereotypes, gender profiling, and inequalities between men and women reduce the impact of public health programs. In Nigeria, for example, many women are excluded from making decisions related to their families’ health and from accessing health services in their communities. These exclusions are due to patriarchal norms, often exacerbated by purdah, a religious and social practice that requires women to cover most parts of their bodies and avoid areas frequented by men.

Gabriel Chima. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

The USAID-supported Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (ProACT) project provides HIV & AIDS treatment, care and community outreach with a full complement of laboratory services in 25 comprehensive care and treatment centers in six Nigerian States: Adamawa, Kogi, Kwara, Kebbi, Niger and Taraba States.

John Tiva Joseph. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

USAID-funded PEPFAR Health Professionals Fellow and laboratory scientist, John Tiva Joseph, returned home from his training determined to improve HIV diagnostic services at his laboratory. Joseph shared what he learned as a PEPFAR Fellow with his antiretroviral therapy (ART) team at General Hospital, Michika, in Adamawa State, Nigeria.

Donation of Supplies for General Hospital in Nigeria. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Samuel Onuh, a young medical doctor serving with Nigeria’s National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) at a rural outpost in Kwara State, recently proved that one determined person can move mountains. Shortly after his arrival at General Hospital Omu Aran, in July, 2010, he watched a child who needed respiratory support due to the absence of a functioning Ambu resuscitator bag in the hospital.

His Royal Highness Alhaji Abubakar Salihu Bawuru (Sarkin Ibi) of the Ibi Community, Taraba State, Nigeria, is on the forefront of the drive to help his people appreciate and embrace HIV intervention programs in their community as part of a healthier lifestyle. He says, "community participation holds the key to national response."Sarkin Ibi's support of MSH's USAID-funded Prevention Organizational AIDS Care and Treatment (ProACT) project has catalyzed the community's response to HIV & AIDS interventions in the Ibi community.

On Tuesday, May 25, 2010, Dr. Paul Waibale, the Project Director for the MSH project Prevention and Organizational Systems—AIDS Care and Treatment (ProACT) in Nigeria, presented at a Congressional Briefing, co-sponsored by Congresswoman Gwen Moore, entitled “Is Health Systems Strengthening the Answer to Improving Maternal Health?” The presentation was attended by over 60 people. Dr. Waibale drew on his experiences in Nigeria with HIV & AIDS, stating that it is strengthening of health and linked systems for health service delivery that is the answer.

 MSH was recently awarded a $60 million five-year follow-on project to the USAID-funded LMS-AIDS Care and Treatment (LMS-ACT) project. Under LMS-ACT (2007-2009), MSH has been assisting the government of Nigeria to take leadership of Nigeria’s HIV & AIDS response at both the federal and state levels, working with the Nigerian government to build the capacity of government health systems, improve health workers’ skills, and take full ownership of providing staff and resources for improved delivery, quality, and sustainability of HIV/AIDS/TB care.

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