FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project: Our Impact

 {Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators}Jemila Hussein, shown here with her vegetable business; is no longer hiding from her HIV diagnosis.Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators

Jemila Hussein, a 35-year-old widow and mother of six, lives in Namba, Migori Sub County, Kenya. In August 2008, Hussein’s life took a downturn when she tested positive for HIV. Deeply ashamed and fearing the stigma and discrimination associated with HIV, she isolated herself from her community. Her husband’s death had significantly reduced the family income, and Hussein worried about her children’s basic needs and education. She was convinced that she would die and leave them orphaned.

 {Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.}Dorothy Onyango, founder and executive director of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK), talks with MSH about WOFAK, her role as a leader and mentor, and how women are contributing to moving towards an AIDS-free generation.Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.

In Kenya, civil society organizations are on the frontline of health service delivery at the community level. At least 50 percent of healthcare services to communities in Kenya are provided through the nongovernmental sector, which is made up primarily of civil society organizations.

Dr. Daraus Bukenya. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

USAID’s FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project (2011–2016) aims to strengthen the institutional capacity of Kenyan civil society organizations (CSOs) so they can have greater impact in implementing community health interventions and strengthen the Kenyan health system as a whole. FANIKISHA is funded by USAID and represents a partnership between MSH, Pact Inc., Danya International, and the Regional AIDS Training Network.MSH spoke with Dr.

Civil society organizations engage institutional strengthening vendors at the Institutional Strengthening Marketplace, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo credit: MSH) Civil society organizations (CSOs) play a critical role in delivering health services to the marginalized, poor, and underserved populations in Kenya. The Government of Kenya, in its Community Health Strategy (CHS), recognizes and supports a strong, strategic role for CSOs in community mobilization and delivering social and health services to achieve health outcomes.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project in Kenya. This five-year project aims to build the capacity of national-level civil society organizations and non-governmental organizations to provide sustainable leadership in the delivery of the community response for the sustained health and well-being of all Kenyans.

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