Uganda: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Mariam Nangobi receives treatment for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) at an MSH-supported health facility in eastern Uganda.Photo credit: MSH staff

Mariam Nangobi was first diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in 2010 when she was 12 years old. After completing a full, eight-month course of treatment, she still tested positive for the disease. She was referred to a larger health facility where she stayed for two months, receiving daily injections. Again, after treatment, she continued to test positive for TB and missed a year of school. Health workers eventually diagnosed her with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) -- a strain of TB that cannot be treated with the two most powerful first-line medicines.

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

The average Ugandan woman gives birth to 6.2 children—a national fertility rate that is among the five highest in sub-Saharan Africa—increasing the chances of complicated pregnancies and deliveries. If all unmet need for modern contraceptive methods in Uganda were satisfied, it is estimated that maternal mortality would drop by 40 percent, and unplanned births and induced abortions would decline by about 85 percent. 

 {Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.}Rose Chebet (right) with her twins, her husband, and the linkage facilitator Helen Chelengat (middle).Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.

When Rose Chebet was five months pregnant with twins, she visited Kapchorwa Hospital in Eastern Uganda for a routine antenatal visit. She was devastated to learn that she was HIV positive and she feared her twins would not survive. Health workers referred Chebet, a first-time mother, to an antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic where she began taking medication.

 {Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}In six months, 485 girls in six schools in Mbale District received HIV & AIDS education.Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

When Sylvia Kabuya entered Mbale Progressive Secondary School in eastern Uganda, she knew little about HIV & AIDS, how it was transmitted, or where to get tested. The 16-year-old’s knowledge about the disease was based on conjecture passed among her peers. Less than 40 percent of Ugandan women aged 15 to 24 have comprehensive knowledge about HIV & AIDS, according to the 2013 Uganda Demographic Health Survey.

 {Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba}A peer educator mobilizes clients for outreach services in Kawempe, Uganda.Photo credit: Geoffrey Ddamba

This story was originally published in US Agency for International Development (USAID)'s Frontlines newsletter and also appeared on the Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project's website, LMGforHealth.org. The LMG Project is funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) with a consortium of partners.

{Photo credit: Rui Pires}Photo credit: Rui Pires

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), through its USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Governance (LMG) Project, trains executive boards in the practices of good governance -- cultivating accountability, engaging stakeholders, setting shared direction, and stewarding resources -- to ultimately improve health outcomes. LMG’s interventions contribute to developing and fine-tuning executive board’s roles and responsibilities. Methodology Links Learning with Results

 {Photo credit: Anicia Filda/RHU Gulu}Reproductive Health Uganda's Gulu Branch Health Center, Uganda.Photo credit: Anicia Filda/RHU Gulu

Located in northern Uganda, Reproductive Health Uganda’s (RHU) Gulu Branch Health Center (Gulu) is one of the busiest clinics in the country—serving over 25,000 clients with sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services per month. When demand for SRH services outpaced Gulu’s supply of sexually transmitted infection (STI) drugs and other essential medicines, the clinic could not continue offering essential SRH services to many who needed them, threatening the equitable access to health care in the community.

 {Photo credit:  Diana Sharone Tumuhairwe} MDR-TB patients receiving continuous health education at Lira hospital.Photo credit: Diana Sharone Tumuhairwe

Although the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in Uganda is declining, multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB), a strain of TB that cannot be treated with the two most powerful first-line medicines, is a growing concern. This is especially true in Uganda’s Lira district, a commercial hub in the Northern region.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Mpigi STRIDES program, Vaccine Day.Photo credit: Rui Pires

STRIDES for Family Health is wrapping up six years of work in Uganda with “impressive” results in reducing malnutrition and expanding access to and improving the quality of integrated reproductive health, family planning, and child survival services. Achievements between 2009 and 2015 included: reaching 614,338 children under the age of five through nutrition programs, achieving average cure rates for moderate malnutrition of 80 percent in some districts; reaching 921,112 new family planning users and serving 720,674 returning clients;

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

Malnutrition is an underlying cause of 45 percent of deaths in children under the age of five worldwide and leaves 165 million children stunted, compromising cognitive development and physical capabilities. Chronically malnourished children are, on average, nearly 20 percent less literate than those who have a nutritious diet. Thus, malnutrition can shape a society's long-term health, stability, and prosperity.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version