Uganda: Our Impact

Principal Dispenser and MTC Secretary, David Ouma in the Moroto regional referral hospital medicines stores

Malaria is the leading cause of outpatient visits in Uganda (Ministry of Health, Annual Health Sector Performance Report, 2015/2016), and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are crucial for reducing preventable deaths, lowering the risk of resistance to antimalarial medicines, and decreasing medicine wastage and misuse. 

On May 21, during the 71st World Health Assembly, member states adopted a new digital health resolution. It urges member states to better utilize digital technologies as a means of promoting equitable, affordable universal health coverage (UHC), including reaching vulnerable populations. The resolution also calls on members to analyze the implications of digital health to achieve health related sustainable development goals.

 {Photo by M4ID}Women participate in the opening ceremony of a Lea Mimba pregnancy club session at a health facility in Kenya.Photo by M4ID

We were pleased to see the blog post from the Maternal Health Task Force which highlighted a review of published literature and informant interviews to develop a common model for group antenatal care (ANC), an innovative service delivery approach for re-organizing ANC in low-resource settings.

{Photo Credit: Rui Pires}Photo Credit: Rui Pires

After five hours of labor, Rachael Kabugho was in excruciating pain. The staff at Bwera Hospital in western Uganda examined her but they lacked the clinical skills to determine why the birth wasn’t progressing. Meanwhile, Kabugho was getting weaker and her pain was becoming worse. Fears were growing that the 29-year-old mother of three and her baby would not survive

{Photo credit: Sarah Lagot}H.E. Deborah Malac, US Ambassador to Uganda, delivers motorbikes to Hon. Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, Minister of Health, to support the implementation of the USAID/Uganda Health Supply Chain program’s Supervision Performance Assessment Recognition Strategy.Photo credit: Sarah Lagot

On November 29, 2017, the US Government donated motorcycles and laptop computers to Uganda’s Ministry of Health as part of its ongoing effort to strengthen the health commodity supply chain system and improve the health of Ugandans. The donation was made possible by the generous support of the American people through USAID’s Uganda Health Supply Chain (UHSC) program, implemented by Management Sciences for Health. 

Herbert Mugumya, Uganda Country Representative for MSH, was invited on the television show Urban Today to talk about MSH’s work in Uganda. Mr. Mugumya discussed the country’s health system and highlighted MSH’s role in ensuring hospital leadership accountability and individuals’ responsibility in seeking health care.

{Photo credit: Sheila Mwebaze}Michelle Lang-Ali, Deputy Director of USAID's Health and HIV/AIDS office; Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, Minister of Health, Uganda; and Birna Trap, Chief of Party, USAID/Uganda Health Supply Chain program, at the launch of the Uganda Clinical Guidelines 2016.Photo credit: Sheila Mwebaze

On September 12, 2017, Uganda’s Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng, launched the Uganda Clinical Guidelines (UCG) 2016 and the Essential Medicines and Health Supplies List for Uganda (EMHSLU) 2016. The Ministry of Health (MoH) reviewed and published the guidelines with support from the USAID/Uganda Health Supply Chain program. The MoH periodically updates the country’s UCG and EMHSLU to provide health professionals with current recommendations on how to best manage the most common health conditions in Uganda.

{Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

How US Foreign Assistance is Making A Difference Uganda has made great progress in controlling the HIV epidemic and increasing access to critical HIV and health services in recent years. Under the Government of Uganda’s leadership and with the support of development partners, such as MSH, Uganda has reached the second of UNAIDS global 90-90-90 goals: 90% of people living with HIV who know their status are on treatment. 

{Photo Credit: Diana Tumuhairwe/MSH}Photo Credit: Diana Tumuhairwe/MSH

At six months pregnant, Angela Namatovu was excited. The pregnancy was going well, and she could not wait to give birth to her baby boy. Like any careful expectant mother, when she developed a cough, she knew that the right thing to do was seek medical attention. She went to a nearby local clinic in the Simbwe, Wakiso district in central Uganda, not thinking her symptom was anything serious. The health facility could not find anything wrong but still referred her to Mulago Hospital. There, she was asked for sputum samples and was also given medication for 10 days.

 {Graphic: African Strategies for Health}Officials from nine African countries convened in Ghana to find solutions to common challenges of attaining universal health coverage (UHC) with sustainability and improved quality of care.Graphic: African Strategies for Health

by African Strategies for Health The goals of universal health coverage (UHC) can only be delivered when access to health services and financial risk protection are equitably addressed.

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