South Sudan: Our Impact

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

 {Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH}Yohana sits with his mother near a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan.Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH

Six-year-old Yohana Peter clutched a bottle of mango juice as he waited for his medication outside a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan. Seated next to his mother on a metal bench, Yohana looked anxious. "He had fever and stomach pain. I gave him some medicines at home, but his condition continued to worsen, so I brought him to the hospital to be seen by a doctor," said Asunta Wasuk, Yohana's mother.

 {Photo Credit: Males Emmanuel/MSH}Baby Mary after two successful weeks on anti-TB treatmentPhoto Credit: Males Emmanuel/MSH

At nine months old, Mary Yeno had lived with TB for nearly half of her short life before being accurately diagnosed and treated. Mary’s mother, Flora Faida, carried the baby to three different health facilities without success. “She was coughing and had difficulty breathing. She stopped breastfeeding,” Faida said.

Dr. Bruno Jeremiah sorts medicine at a medical store at Al Sabah Children’s Hospital in Juba, South Sudan.

Dr. Bruno Jeremiah, a pharmacist at Al Sabbah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan, squats on the floor in his white coat. He selects small cartons of medicine to hand to his colleague, storekeeper Julius Leonardo. The South Sudan Ministry of Health's medicine supply system is kit-based, meaning that medicines are packed into kits for quarterly distribution to health facilities. Kits must be opened, sorted, and inventoried by a pharmacist or a trained health professional to ensure easy access, accurate documentation, and effective management.

 {Photo: MSH staff}Nimeri and his family relocated to Yei when war broke out in Juba. Nimeri was in his sixth month of TB treatment.Photo: MSH staff

Ripenti Nimeri Yotma is a 40-year-old soldier who has lived through war and being displaced. But it was a battle with Tuberculosis (TB) that almost killed him. The father of three children (aged 14, 4, and one and a half), Nimeri presently lives in Logobero Village, Yei Boma. However, his illness started in April 2013 while he was still living in Juba. When his persistent cough eventually led to him coughing up blood-stained mucus, Nimeri’s wife took him to the nearest health center in Juba City, where he was examined.

 {Photo credit: LMG/South Sudan}Midwives in South Sudan receive capacity development training through the Leadership, Management and Governance for Midwifery Managers Certificate Course.Photo credit: LMG/South Sudan

This story originally appeared on the Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG) Project Blog. The LMG project is funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) with a consortium of partners. More women die during childbirth in South Sudan than in any country on Earth—over 2,000 mothers per 100,000 live births.

 {Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH}David Kolang leads a community awareness session on TB.Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates prevalence for all forms of tuberculosis (TB) in South Sudan to be 146 for every 100,000 people.

 {Photo credit: Erin Polich/MSH.}Tambura County, South Sudan.Photo credit: Erin Polich/MSH.

Located in Western Equatoria State of South Sudan, Tambura County is poor, remote, and struggling to overcome the effects of decades of civil war. Yet, finding solutions to complex problems is not new for the people of Tambura County. When it came time to fix the broken pharmaceutical system, with the help of SIAPS, Tambura County’s health authorities took the initiative to shift away from the push supply system for pharmaceuticals to a pull system.

Dr. Anyo takes staff and interns through a hands-on training exercise during onsite supervision. {Photo credit: Gladys Anyo/MSH.}Photo credit: Gladys Anyo/MSH.

While tuberculosis (TB) is receiving widespread attention in the global health community, many in South Sudan still consider this disease a repulsive affliction and feel uncomfortable associating with TB patients. In addition to fear and discrimination in the general population, the nation’s health professionals often avoid working with TB patients, TB equipment, and sputum samples for fear that they could become infected themselves.

Dr. Eliud Wandwalo. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

MSH works with international, national, and local partners to strengthen the capacity of health systems, national tuberculosis (TB) programs, and health managers to improve the lives of those affected by TB and prevent the spread of the disease. MSH participates in several global TB initiatives, including USAID’s Tuberculosis CARE I Program (following the TB CAP program); the STOP TB Partnership; and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version