Tanzania: Our Impact

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

Many people in rural Tanzania seek health care and medicines from retail drug shops, called duka la dawa baridi, for reasons such as convenience. Historically, the Tanzania Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA) authorized duka la dawa baridi to provide nonprescription medicines; however, a 2001 assessment showed that many shops sold prescription drugs illegally and that the drug sellers were generally unqualified and untrained.

In a recent survey, a team from the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) and Management Sciences for Health found that human resource (HR) managers in four East African countries—Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda—want and need better preparation to carry out their responsibilities, which include recruitment and deployment of staff, HR planning and policy, and training. The study recommended seeking professionals for these roles and providing short courses in HR management and leadership.

Around the world, millions of dollars have been allocated to fight HIV/AIDS. National programs need sound financial management skills to efficiently disburse these funds, while organizations implementing programs need to access funds, use them appropriately, and promptly demonstrate results.Just two years ago in Tanzania, hundreds of civil society organizations struggled to access funding for urgent HIV/AIDS activities.

"We will expand, scale-up, and cover more districts...but only in partnership with other [non-governmental organizations] NGOs and the public sector." Staff from the East African Development Communication Foundation (EADCF) sit together in their office in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, nodding in agreement as the director reflects on the group's successes and describes how it will build on them to reach more Tanzanians with crucial HIV/AIDS information.Like many organizations in Tanzania, EADCF has struggled to understand not only how to access the millions of dollars promised by international donor

Warned that she was ill, we expected to find 50-year-old Salome Kombe in bed and ready to die. Though she is among an older demographic of HIV-infected Tanzanians, Salome is by no means retiring. Surprisingly, she walked to greet us, looking happy and strong. HIV-positive and living in a one-room shack, Salome is unemployed and struggles to care for three grandchildren; ensuring they have enough food is a daily effort. Her neighbors and family offer some support, but are equally poor.

Through the Global Fund Technical Support Project, MSH will support Global Fund grantees around the world to build their organizational and human capacity for improved prevention, care, and treatment of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.CAMBRIDGE, MA —The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has selected Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to lead the Global Fund Technical Support (GFTS) Project, an initiative that provides technical assistance to grantees of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria who are working on the prevention and treatment of these di

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