Tanzania: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Brooke Huskey / MSH}Photo credit: Brooke Huskey / MSH

Tanzania’s Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, the Elderly, and Children (MOH) recently approved a health sector task sharing implementation plan with support from the Tanzania Technical Support Services Project (TSSP), led by Management Sciences for Health.The plan will assist public health institutions to improve human resources for health (HRH), which will help increase essential HIV service coverage through improved service delivery. Implementation will begin in July 2017.

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Management Sciences for Health has been working closely in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance) on the introduction of the new dispersible pediatric fixed-dose combination. Through MSH’s projects across identified high-burden countries, we have been providing assistance on updating treatment guidelines and essential medicines lists, registration of the reformulated product, financing and reprogramming grants, quantification, and training healthcare providers on the medicine and its use. 

 {Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania}Vincent Nanai conducts routine inventory in the Bariadi District pharmacy store.Photo: Michael Bajile/MSH-Tanzania

As a pharmacist with the Bariadi Council Health Management Team in Tanzania’s Lake Zone, Vincent Nanai is responsible for ensuring that all 23 public health facilities supported by the council are stocked with essential commodities. However, prior to Nanai’s training from the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Tibu Homa project, many public health facilities within the Lake Zone frequently ran out of medicines and supplies.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

Leadership, management, and governance skills are critical for medical, nursing, and public health professionals. The MSH-led, US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project with project partner Amref Health Africa developed an action-based learning, in-service certificate course to equip midwife managers with the leadership, management, and governance skills they need to deliver quality health services.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Cecilia tracks medication usage to prevent stock-outs of medicines and supplies at the Kiloleli Dispensary, Mwanza, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Cecilia Lunda has wanted to be a nurse since she was a little girl when her mother, a nurse, sparked Lunda's passion for helping people. As she grew up, Lunda studied hard and made her dream come true—she has worked as a nurse at the Kiloleli Dispensary in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania for four years.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Suzanna Tungu, a pharmacy assistant in an outpatient pharmacy at the Shinyanga Regional Hospital in Tanzania. Susanna receives capacity building support and on-the-job training from her supervisor, Luciano Lorde, who was trained by the Tibu Homa project in supply chain management.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Tanzania is among six countries with the highest malaria morbidity and mortality in the world. It is estimated that malaria kills 60,000 to 80,000 of the 10 to 12 million people who fall ill from the disease each year in the country. Children are particularly vulnerable to malaria. Though the overall under-five mortality rate is improving in Tanzania—it declined by 28 percent between 2003 and 2010—it remains high in the Lake Zone at 120 deaths per 1,000 live births, according to the 2010 Tanzania Demographic Health Survey (TDHS).

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

 {Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.}Business Planning for Health participants in Zanzibar, June 2013.Photo credit: TZ-ICB Library.

Resource mobilization has been a challenge for Tanzania’s National Health Laboratory (NHL).

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health—with financial support from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USAID and other partners—has been working in Tanzania on scaling up the Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDO) Program since 2002, in support of the Government of Tanzania's efforts to improve access to essential medicines and pharmaceutical services.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Accredited drug shop (ADS) in Uganda.Photo credit: Rui Pires

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly one-third of the developing world population lacks regular access to quality essential medicines. In rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa, most people first turn to community drug shops for their medicines; yet these shops may not be legally licensed, have trained staff, or sell quality-assured medicines. Committed to Expanding Access to Quality Essential Medicines 

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