Nigeria: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH Nigeria}Photo credit: MSH Nigeria

Motivated by drastic improvements in record keeping, record storage capacity, and shorter consultation times—all due to the introduction of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system—the Federal Medical Center Gusau, Zamfara has committed to scaling up the EMR system.

{ Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthournieu} Photo credit: Gwenn Dubourthournieu

Narba Shenom, a 42-year-old living with HIV in Sabon Garin, Kaura Namoda, Zamfara state, could not disclose her HIV status to her husband, a peasant farmer, or to any of her husband’s other three wives, due to the fear of stigma and discrimination associated with HIV in the community. Narba’s situation was challenging because, like many women from the area, she did not work and depended solely on her husband to provide for her and their children.

 {Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo, MSH}Representative of the Hon. Minister of Health, Mr. Arioye Segilola (right), and Dr. Zipporah Kpamor, Country Representative for MSH with other dignitaries displaying the unveiled 2016 National Guidelines on HIV/AIDS in Kaduna State, Nigeria.Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo, MSH

On June 20, 2017, the National AIDS and STIs Control Programme of the Federal Ministry of Health in collaboration with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) hosted the launch of the North-West Zonal Dissemination of the 2016 National Guidelines for HIV Prevention Treatment and Care, in Kaduna State, Nigeria.

 {Okechukwu Onyezue/MSH}Karimu Muazu and her groundnut oil businessOkechukwu Onyezue/MSH

Despite decades of progress and efforts made to improve the status of women and children in Nigeria, inequality and poverty persist. In many households in northern Nigeria, women are the caregivers. However, without a steady source of income, they can barely provide for their families. An orphans and vulnerable children program, organized by the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, implemented by MSH, provides integrated services to such vulnerable households, including HIV-infected and affected households.

 {Graphic: African Strategies for Health}Officials from nine African countries convened in Ghana to find solutions to common challenges of attaining universal health coverage (UHC) with sustainability and improved quality of care.Graphic: African Strategies for Health

by African Strategies for Health The goals of universal health coverage (UHC) can only be delivered when access to health services and financial risk protection are equitably addressed.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Baby Rosemary and her parents in Onuk Essien Udim Local Government Area, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria.Photo credit: MSH staff

Chief Victor Joseph Ntuen is village head of Onuk, Ukana clan in Essien Udim Local Government Area (LGA) in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He and his wife Emem have five children. Their youngest, 11-month-old Rosemary, fell seriously ill in January. She constantly vomited and had diarrhea for over one week. Baby Rosemary was diagnosed with cholera. Chief Ntuen was devastated at the thought of losing his baby girl to the cholera outbreak ravaging the community. But, they had no money to take Rosemary to the hospital for treatment. He and Emem had just paid their older children’s school fees.

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Management Sciences for Health has been working closely in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance) on the introduction of the new dispersible pediatric fixed-dose combination. Through MSH’s projects across identified high-burden countries, we have been providing assistance on updating treatment guidelines and essential medicines lists, registration of the reformulated product, financing and reprogramming grants, quantification, and training healthcare providers on the medicine and its use. 

 {Photo: MSH staff}Nse (on right) with CBHI Board of Trustees Chairman, June 2015Photo: MSH staff

Nse Usoro Odo is a 56-year-old farmer who lives with his wife, a small-scale trader, and their children in Ikot Udo Idem community in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. He is also the village town crier and a member of the Village Development Committee (VDC). Members of the VDC are responsible for conveying knowledge and information to community members. Combined earnings for Odo and his wife are around 700 naira or N700 (less than $3.50 USD) per day.

 {Photo Credit: Atlantic Dialogues}The 2015 "Emerging Leaders" at Atlantic DialoguesPhoto Credit: Atlantic Dialogues

Adaeze Umolu landed at the Casablanca Airport in Morocco on the October 28, filled with anticipation. It was her first time in the country. As a technical advisor at MSH, Adaeze was one of 40 "emerging leaders" invited to participate in the 2015 Atlantic Dialogues, an annual gathering of 350 public- and private-sector leaders from around the Atlantic Basin. "It was an honor to have been selected," she said. "These few days were fulfilling and memorable."

{Photo Credit: Adaeze Umolu/MSH}Photo Credit: Adaeze Umolu/MSH

A town in Nigeria is using creative writing to teach girls about reproductive health. And it's working. In January 2015, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and partners launched the "Amdo Health Club" at Government Day Secondary School in Tal, Biliri Local Government Area (LGA), in Gombe State, Nigeria. "Amdo" translates to "Love."

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