Kenya: Our Impact

Civil society organizations engage institutional strengthening vendors at the Institutional Strengthening Marketplace, Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo credit: MSH) Civil society organizations (CSOs) play a critical role in delivering health services to the marginalized, poor, and underserved populations in Kenya. The Government of Kenya, in its Community Health Strategy (CHS), recognizes and supports a strong, strategic role for CSOs in community mobilization and delivering social and health services to achieve health outcomes.

Dr. Catherine Mundy.Dr. Catherine Mundy.

Laboratory services are a necessary but sometimes neglected element of a strong health system. From disease control and surveillance to patient diagnosis and care, laboratories are central to public health. Where laboratory services, policies or strategy are lacking, a comprehensive systems approach can improve a nation's infrastructure and capacity to manage and finance laboratory systems.MSH spoke with Dr.

To improve access to laboratory testing, supervision and quality  assurance, Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH) Strengthening Public  Health Laboratory Systems Project in Kenya -- funded by PEPFAR  (President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) through the Centers for  Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- is supporting the Kenyan Ministry of Health (MOH) in strengthening the national laboratory referral networks. Health services in Kenya are structured into four hierarchical levels  of care: dispensary, health center, district and provincial or na

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project in Kenya. This five-year project aims to build the capacity of national-level civil society organizations and non-governmental organizations to provide sustainable leadership in the delivery of the community response for the sustained health and well-being of all Kenyans.

Two websites supported by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) have increased usage and reach as of March 2011. These tools are important HIV resources for the global health community to help build capacity and share best practices.

When the University of Nairobi’s School of Public Health was officially launched last month, it was the culmination of a twenty-year-old dream, brought to fruition by a team of persistent, dedicated Kenyan academics and the more recent support of Management Sciences for Health (MSH).At the ceremonial opening of the school, Professor Jacob Kaimenyi, Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs said, “The future belongs to the people who believe in the duty of their dreams.” He may have been speaking specifically of Dr.

At public referral hospitals in Kenya, the development of operating plans typically involves just three people: the hospital medical superintendent, the hospital administrative officer, and the health records officer. Together this small team sets the upcoming quarter’s spending priorities for the entire hospital based on revenues and fees collected in the prior quarter. Scrambling to address the most urgent needs of the immediate future with limited and quickly evaporating funds hampers the realization of a coherent, long-term vision for the hospital.

The most recent Frontlines, a news publication produced by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), features a leadership development program offered by MSH in Kenya. "Kenyan Mothers Choose Hospitals for Births," describes how a chief nursing officer at the Kendu Bay Sub-district Hospital applied management skills she learned in a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program offered by MSH to work with her colleagues to nearly double the hospital delivery rate by 60 percent by creating a "Mothers Club" for local women.

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

MSH staff reported on the results of projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia, and Rwanda at this year’s meeting of agencies that implement programs funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Windhoek, Namibia, from June 10 to 14. The meeting brought together about 1,500 people from 55 countries to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against AIDS.

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