Kenya: Our Impact

The Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Information and Communication, Dr. Bitange Ndemo. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Monitoring and reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and poor-quality human medicines has gone digital in Kenya. Medical experts and patients can now detect, assess, and report unpleasant reactions to pharmaceutical products in real time to the Pharmacy and Poisons Board’s (PPB) National Pharmacovigilance Centre.

Mugo Kibati, Vision 2030 Secretariat, presents on day one of the conference. {Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Earlier this month, Kenya presidential candidate Ole Kiyapi was asked, during the country’s first ever televised presidential debate, what his plans were for the health sector. The former permanent secretary for the Ministry of Health replied without hesitating that he would emphasize strengthening leadership and management capacity in health workers.

Baby Victor and his mother. {Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya}Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya

Around 11 in the morning, mothers start streaming into the health facility. Baby Victor’s mother has brought him today for a routine immunization, but she’s also concerned about his lack of appetite and high fever. The nurses recommend that one-year-old Victor be tested for malaria.Thanks to a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit, Victor’s test results come back in just half an hour.

A SARO participant explains how observed behaviors can demonstrate the practices of a leader. {Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

In June 2010, USAID’s MEASURE Evaluation, phase III (MEval-III) launched a Leadership Development Program (LDP), led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), in the Southeast Asia Regional Office (SARO) of International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). IPPF is a global organization that works through a network of country member associations and select partnerships with local organizations to provide services and advocate for sexual and reproductive rights around the world.

Malaria continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries, especially in Sub Saharan Africa. In Kenya, malaria alone accounts for 30% of outpatient admittance and up to 5% of inpatient deaths while 170 million working days are lost annually because of it.In 2004, Kenya changed its malaria treatment policy opting for the use of artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria.

The journal Human Resources for Health recently published an article highlighting a study of the Management Sciences for Health Leadership Development Program in Kenya.

Most African countries are slowly moving toward achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to provide access to appropriate health care services for all at an affordable cost. Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), “Health for All: The Campaign for Universal Health Coverage (UHC)” will support existing government initiatives towards universal health coverage and equitable health reform in four African nations: Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Ghana.

Homa Bay TB team, MSF, and SIAPS collaboration. (Photo credit: MSH)Successful treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is one of the key indicators of a TB Control Program’s performance and essential to containing the emergence of anti-TB drug resistance. Multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) treatment requires medicines that are expensive, involve longer treatment regimens, are toxic, and can cause patients to have severe side effects.

Elizabeth Oywer, the registrar of the Nursing Council of Kenya (center), is recognized for completing the Leading High Performing Healthcare Organizations by Dr. Edward Mungai, dean of the Strathmore School of Business in Nairobi, and Joan Mansour, leadership development specialist at Management Sciences for Health. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Four years ago, a national assessment done by the Ministry of Health in Kenya showed that 61% of health managers felt inadequately prepared for their roles due to lack of skills in leadership and health systems management. The assessment report recommended that these gaps be addressed at the pre-service and in-service training levels for health workers and also at the senior management level of the health sector.

Dr. Daraus Bukenya. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

USAID’s FANIKISHA Institutional Strengthening Project (2011–2016) aims to strengthen the institutional capacity of Kenyan civil society organizations (CSOs) so they can have greater impact in implementing community health interventions and strengthen the Kenyan health system as a whole. FANIKISHA is funded by USAID and represents a partnership between MSH, Pact Inc., Danya International, and the Regional AIDS Training Network.MSH spoke with Dr.

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