Kenya: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

 {Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.}Dorothy Onyango, founder and executive director of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK), talks with MSH about WOFAK, her role as a leader and mentor, and how women are contributing to moving towards an AIDS-free generation.Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.

In Kenya, civil society organizations are on the frontline of health service delivery at the community level. At least 50 percent of healthcare services to communities in Kenya are provided through the nongovernmental sector, which is made up primarily of civil society organizations.

{Photo credit: William Vasquez}Photo credit: William Vasquez

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), under its PEPFAR, USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability/Kenya project, has been appointed as a Continuous Professional Development provider by the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board (KMPDB). Participants in Kenya taking the LMS/Kenya leadership and management related courses—Health Systems Management (HSM) and the Leadership Development Program (LDP)—will now earn credit points for these courses.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Dr. Rafida, a pharmacist at Coast Provincial General Hospital, enters patient information into the ADT pharmacy management software.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

“My wife was the first to discover her status. After giving birth, she started feeling unwell and […] tested positive for HIV,” says Mzee Ahmed*, who later learned his son, Juma, was also HIV positive. “After learning my wife’s status, it took me awhile to get tested but I eventually got the courage to get tested. The test was positive and I was also put on antiretroviral treatment,” explains Ahmed. Six years later, they all remain on their antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimens and visit health facilities regularly to refill their ARV prescriptions.

 {Photo credit: MSH}A patient receives treatment in a new chemotherapy seat.Photo credit: MSH

The Kenyatta National Hospital Cancer Treatment Center (CTC) is the only health facility in Kenya where the poor can obtain advanced comprehensive treatment for cancer. But given the high demand for services, these patients often experience delays of up to five weeks to see a doctor, resulting in complications and, in some cases, death. This situation is exacerbated by insufficient medical personnel as well as inadequate and in some cases dilapidated equipment.

 {Photo credit: Doris Bota / MSH.}Edison Kiprono Chepkonga, a medical laboratory technologist, is championing standards in health care at the district hospital.Photo credit: Doris Bota / MSH.

“Nothing lifts your heart more than giving your support and time to a good cause.” These were the words of Edison Kiprono Chepkonga, a medical laboratory technologist working at Kapsabet District hospital, situated in Nandi County (Rift Valley region), Kenya.  Edison is one of the 26 laboratory personnel that benefited from a biosafety training supported by the PEPFAR/CDC-funded Strengthening Public Health Laboratory Systems (SPHLS), led by MSH. The hospital has a bed capacity of 137. Thirty-seven satellite health facilities refer laboratory samples to the hospital.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Gertrude Kinyua shares her vision at the LDP results workshop in Nairobi in September.Photo credit: MSH

"I had always wanted to start a community gender based violence outreach program as a link between Kenyatta National Hospital and the community," says Ms. Gertrude Kinyua, a Senior Nursing Officer/Sexual Forensic Nurse at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). That was Gertrude’s unrealized dream for a long time, until she participated in a Leadership Development Program (LDP) offered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership Management and Sustainability (LMS) Project in Kenya.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH}Dr. John Chimumbwa, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) program Chief of Party, speaks at the launch.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH

Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) unveiled a new drug formulary, the first of its kind in Kenya, on September 6, 2013. The formulary consists of a list of all drugs used at KNH and guidelines on prescribing, dispensing, and providing medicine information to patients. 

 {Photo credit: Beth Brundage Murphy for MSH}Participants enjoying the Health for All Campaign launch in Ethiopia this year.Photo credit: Beth Brundage Murphy for MSH

Health for All: The Campaign for Universal Health Coverage in Africa, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, is supporting governments in three African countries (Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Kenya) in their efforts to achieve universal health coverage (UHC).

{Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno}Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno

“Medicine can be poisonous if it is contaminated. It can poison my clients, who will keep returning to the facility. To prevent contamination of the medicines we receive, our facility has invested in proper storage facilities,” says Mr. Andrew Mabele, a clinical officer responsible for screening outpatients, reviewing lab results, and providing HIV and tuberculosis patient follow-up treatment in the Kabichbich Health Centre.

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