Kenya: Our Impact

MSH Kenya team receives the CICF Award. From left to right: Zoe Hensby (DFID), Spencer Ochieng (MSH Kenya Country Representative), Melissa Wanda Kirowo (FCI Program of MSH), Jamilla Wamwiri (Kenya Progressive Nurses Association), and Boniface Njenga (MSH Country operations Director)

The County Innovation Challenge Fund (CICF) is a five-year program funded by UKAid and implemented by an array of partners to support innovative interventions, products, processes, services, technologies and ideas that reduce maternal and newborn mortality in Kenya.

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

Photo Credit: Mark Tuschman

MSH’s country representative for Kenya Spencer Ochieng spoke to Citizen TV yesterday about the successes and challenges Kenya faces in its effort to improve maternal health.  Maternal and newborn health in Kenya has drastically improved since 2013, when the government instituted a new policy of free maternal services at public hospitals. Since 2013, the number of deaths during childbirth each year has been reduced by one-third, and the number of women who deliver under the watch of a skilled health worker has nearly doubled, according to Citizen TV.

 {Photo credit: APHRC}A peer educator in Viwandani talks about mentorship of young boys in the slum at the video screening.Photo credit: APHRC

The video, Meeting the Needs of Urban Youth, tells the story of adolescents and service providers living in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya, and explores issues around access to sexual and reproductive health services in urban settings. Produced by African Strategies for Health's partners, the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) and Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the video was recently screened at Viwandani and Korogocho, the two communities featured on the film.

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Management Sciences for Health has been working closely in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance) on the introduction of the new dispersible pediatric fixed-dose combination. Through MSH’s projects across identified high-burden countries, we have been providing assistance on updating treatment guidelines and essential medicines lists, registration of the reformulated product, financing and reprogramming grants, quantification, and training healthcare providers on the medicine and its use. 

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

HIV testing and counseling is central to HIV and AIDS prevention and control as well as improving the quality of patients’ lives. Individuals learn their HIV status and receive personalized risk-reduction counseling to help prevent acquiring or further transmitting of HIV while those found positive are enrolled for support, care, and treatment. Until 2014, only 46 percent of inpatients at Msambweni Sub-County Hospital in Kwale County were tested for HIV. This changed in 2015 when a team from the hospital set out to increase the number of inpatients tested for HIV.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

Leadership, management, and governance skills are critical for medical, nursing, and public health professionals. The MSH-led, US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Leadership, Management & Governance (LMG) Project with project partner Amref Health Africa developed an action-based learning, in-service certificate course to equip midwife managers with the leadership, management, and governance skills they need to deliver quality health services.

 {Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators}Jemila Hussein, shown here with her vegetable business; is no longer hiding from her HIV diagnosis.Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators

Jemila Hussein, a 35-year-old widow and mother of six, lives in Namba, Migori Sub County, Kenya. In August 2008, Hussein’s life took a downturn when she tested positive for HIV. Deeply ashamed and fearing the stigma and discrimination associated with HIV, she isolated herself from her community. Her husband’s death had significantly reduced the family income, and Hussein worried about her children’s basic needs and education. She was convinced that she would die and leave them orphaned.

 {Photo credit: Ruth Omondi/MSH.}Two women beneficiares of the integrated HIV and MNCH program at the Mbeere District Hospital.Photo credit: Ruth Omondi/MSH.

Mbeere District Hospital, following USAID-funded LMS/Kenya support, increases the number of HIV-positive mothers delivering healthy babies According to the Ministry of Health, 13,000 babies in Kenya are born HIV-positive each year, despite availability of proven methods to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus. One of these is integrating HIV care and treatment into maternal and child health services. In 2013, Mbeere District Hospital in Embu County decided to take this approach to reduce the number of children born with HIV in their facility. 

Dr. Andrew Nyandigisi from the Malaria Control Unit discusses lessons learned in the implementation of DHIS2 with workshop participants. {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

An effective reporting system for health commodities is critical to ensure accountability, enable informed decision making, and provide timely access to information. Using DHIS2 to Manage Data for Malaria Commodities

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