Guinea: Our Impact

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

 Screenshot of SIAPS West Africa Regional Project dashboard shows national stock status in Niger; three products in blue have more than 100 months in stock.

Alerts of stock-outs of life-saving medicines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and treating opportunistic infections have emerged from a number of countries in West Africa. Several root causes of stock-outs have been identified such as poor coordination and information sharing among partners.

  {Photo credit: Sara A. Holtz, Courtesy of Photoshare.}A billboard in Guinea promotes injectable contraceptives: "Depo-Provera: Efficacious, Reversible, Discrete. Contraceptive with a long duration."Photo credit: Sara A. Holtz, Courtesy of Photoshare.

Family planning is an inherent part of quality postabortion care services—allowing women to choose a contraceptive method that best meets their needs helps prevent unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions, and increases their choices for future planning. Yet, despite the evidence that family planning is a crucial part of successful postabortion care services, in many settings, these services are not yet integrated.

 {Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH}SIAPS West Africa Regional Program launches, April 2014.Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH

Antiretroviral (ARV) medicines are a matter of life or death for people who are HIV-positive.  In West Africa, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) is working to make sure people have uninterrupted access to these life-saving medicines.

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)In Guinea, malaria is a common threat year-round, especially during the rainy season that lasts from May to October. It affects everyone, but for children under five years of age, appropriate and immediate treatment could mean the difference between life and death.

Through the Global Fund Technical Support Project, MSH will support Global Fund grantees around the world to build their organizational and human capacity for improved prevention, care, and treatment of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.CAMBRIDGE, MA —The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has selected Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to lead the Global Fund Technical Support (GFTS) Project, an initiative that provides technical assistance to grantees of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria who are working on the prevention and treatment of these di

KANKAN, GUINEA  — A girls' soccer program in Upper Guinea promoting prevention of HIV/AIDS and unwanted pregnancies proved so successful that UNICEF and the country's Ministry of Youth decided to replicate the program for young adults in Middle Guinea. The soccer program was developed by the PRISM project as part of its strategy to reach youth with messages designed to prevent HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections (STI), and unwanted pregnancies.

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