Burkina Faso: Our Impact

 Screenshot of SIAPS West Africa Regional Project dashboard shows national stock status in Niger; three products in blue have more than 100 months in stock.

Alerts of stock-outs of life-saving medicines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and treating opportunistic infections have emerged from a number of countries in West Africa. Several root causes of stock-outs have been identified such as poor coordination and information sharing among partners.

  {Photo credit: Sara A. Holtz, Courtesy of Photoshare.}A billboard in Guinea promotes injectable contraceptives: "Depo-Provera: Efficacious, Reversible, Discrete. Contraceptive with a long duration."Photo credit: Sara A. Holtz, Courtesy of Photoshare.

Family planning is an inherent part of quality postabortion care services—allowing women to choose a contraceptive method that best meets their needs helps prevent unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions, and increases their choices for future planning. Yet, despite the evidence that family planning is a crucial part of successful postabortion care services, in many settings, these services are not yet integrated.

 {Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH}SIAPS West Africa Regional Program launches, April 2014.Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH

Antiretroviral (ARV) medicines are a matter of life or death for people who are HIV-positive.  In West Africa, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) is working to make sure people have uninterrupted access to these life-saving medicines.

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