Haiti: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Patricia Forestal}Alyssa Leggoe of USAID/Haiti hands over LMG/Haiti project deliverables to Dr. Adrien Lauré, representing Haiti's health ministry.Photo credit: Patricia Forestal

An event celebrating the successful conclusion of the MSH-led, USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Governance Project in Haiti (LMG/Haiti) provided an opportunity to look back at the project's five years of effective work to strengthen the Haitian health system.

MSH is working with Project C.U.R.E., an organization that provides donated medical supplies and equipment to developing countries around the world, to provide medical supplies and equipment to facilities in Haiti that were damaged by Hurricane Matthew in October 2016. For example, the main district hospital in Les Cayes, Immaculee Conception, lost its surgical unit and dental unit in the flooding and hurricane. Project C.U.R.E., MSH and Haiti Air Ambulance recently conducted needs assessments of facilities in Department Sud.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Attendees pose for a group photo at the launch ceremony for the updated Package of Essential Services.Photo credit: MSH

Even before the 2010 earthquake, Haiti’s public health system struggled to meet the growing demand for services by low-income families, and when disaster struck on January 12, 2010, the already-struggling health services around the country sustained extensive damage. Since then, the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), with support from a range of donors and partners, has been rebuilding to meet its obligation to provide a timely, adequate, and efficient response to the population’s need for health services.

MSH Country Representative Dr. Margareth MalletPhoto Credit: Ministry of Health and Population

Haiti's Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) officially unveiled a manual for introducing the country's new Essential Package of Health Services at a ceremony today in Pétion Ville. The manual outlines relevant mandates and defines how service provision should be structured in health facilities to effectively deliver the package.

 {Photo credit: SCMS}SCMS staff provides technical assistance to head of pharmacy at Hôpital Bernard Mevs in Haiti.Photo credit: SCMS

Hôpital Bernard Mevs is one of 177 sites where the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), a US President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-funded project, delivers lifesaving HIV & AIDS drugs and commodities in Haiti. On any given day, dozens of the more than 1,070 patients currently on antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the hospital wait outside the pharmacy’s door where Rose-Marie Marcelin dispenses their monthly supply of medication.

 {Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.}SCMS leads a national quantification exercise to ensure the availability of lifesaving drugs for nearly 55,000 HIV & AIDS patients.Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.

An estimated 141,000 people live with HIV in Haiti. In support of the Ministry of Public Health and the Population (MSPP)’s continued effort to improve the lives of people living with the virus, the US Government, through the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), collaborates with the National AIDS Program to achieve its objective of having at least 90 percent of the eligible population on antiretroviral treatment (ART) by September 2015.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}Marie Claude Joseph updating commodity management records at the Santé Lumière Health Center in Haiti.Photo credit: MSH staff.

In Haiti, only 31 percent of married women use modern family planning methods. According to the 2012 Demographic and Health Survey (known as the DHS), 52 percent of births in the country are wanted; 21 percent are unwanted; and 27 percent of pregnancies occur sooner than desired. Despite the evident need for family planning services, many facilities in Haiti, including the Santé Lumière Health Center in the Cayes district, have not been able to provide them.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}Nurse Odila Jeune Gens is responsible for family planning services at the Dity health center.Photo credit: MSH staff.

Located in the remote highlands of Haiti’s northwest region of Port-de-Paix, the Dity health center has not always been able to provide adequate family planning services to women in the 21 surrounding communities, despite the obvious need. Maternal and infant mortality is high in the region due to the high number of births, short intervals between pregnancies, and the lack of skilled birth attendants.

 {Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH}Joseph Borgelain inserts the cartridge into the PIMA machine to perform a rapid CD4 test for Paul.Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH

Two-year-old Paul had been sick for several days. On October 12, 2013, his aunt Marie brought him to the Jules Fleury Hospital in the Nippes department of Haiti. Two weeks prior, Paul’s mother, who is HIV-positive, had left for Port-au-Prince in search of work, leaving Paul in the care of his aunt.

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

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