Bangladesh: Our Impact

 {Photo Credit: Mohammad Hossain/MSH}Tama with her daughter Sangita, who received treatment for potentially fatal, pneumonia-related complications.Photo Credit: Mohammad Hossain/MSH

Tama, a resident of Parokhali village in the Khulna district of Bangladesh, was devastated when her 15-day-old daughter was diagnosed with pneumonia-related complications and needed treatment, including immediate oxygen support. Following instructions from the local doctor, she and her husband rushed their newborn to Khulna Shishu Hospital, situated eight kilometers from her village. Thanks to the oxygen supply system that had been recently installed at the hospital, baby Sangita received a steady flow of medical oxygen and recovered.

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Management Sciences for Health has been working closely in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance) on the introduction of the new dispersible pediatric fixed-dose combination. Through MSH’s projects across identified high-burden countries, we have been providing assistance on updating treatment guidelines and essential medicines lists, registration of the reformulated product, financing and reprogramming grants, quantification, and training healthcare providers on the medicine and its use. 

 {Photo credit: Francis Hajong/MSH}Anika and her mother.Photo credit: Francis Hajong/MSH

Anika was a 22-month-old baby girl living in Belai Chandi Kuthipara in the northern part of Bangladesh when she became sick with fever, cough, and weight loss. She was admitted to the LAMB’s Missionary Hospital in Parbotipur, run by one of the many NGOs where the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Challenge TB project, led by Management Sciences for health (MSH) in Bangladesh, is funding active tuberculosis (TB) case finding among high-risk groups such as children, people living with HIV, and diabetics.

{Photo credit: Loren Gomes/SIAPS}Photo credit: Loren Gomes/SIAPS

Curbing the spread of tuberculosis (TB) requires that patients have uninterrupted access to a full course of treatment—frequently a difficult task in developing country settings considering that each regimen includes multiple medicines taken over the span of several months. These may need to be customized based on the type of TB being treated and the patient’s reaction to the prescribed combination. The emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDRTB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDRTB) further complicates the management of TB medicines.

 {Photo credi: Warren Zelman}Democratic Republic of the Congo.Photo credi: Warren Zelman

We spoke with Management Sciences for Health (MSH)’s Beth Yeager, MHS, Principal Technical Advisor, Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program, and Chair, Maternal Health Supplies Caucus, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition, about MSH’s global technical leadership on improving access to maternal health medicines and commodities. MSH serves as an active member of the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) and the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition. Beth Yeager

Medicines and supplies that can prevent and treat leading causes of maternal and child morbidity and mortality are widely known, yet millions of pregnant women and newborns cannot access these medicines and supplies when they need them most.USAID’s Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), presented on systems for improving drug management at this year’s Asia Regional Meeting on Interventions for Impact in Essential Obstetric and Newborn Care.

Madaripur Sadar is one of 483 upazilas (or sub-districts) in Bangladesh that have installed the Upazila Inventory Management System (UIMS) -- a computer program developed by the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT and updated by Management Sciences for Health's (MSH's) Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program for Bangladesh's Directorate General of Family Planning (DGFP).With a total of 101 service delivery points, Madaripur Sadar is a large upazilla in terms of family planning area coverage and the number of field workers deployed.

The DGFP team stand with SCIP awards from the Digital Innovation Fair. (Photo Credit: MSH.}he DGFP team stand with SCIP awards from the Digital Innovation Fair. (Photo Credit: MSH.

Over the past few decades, USAID has supported strengthening the supply chain management system in Bangladesh to ensure reproductive health commodity security. To ensure that patients receive medicines and commodities when they need them, the pharmaceutical supply chain must be both efficient and effective.

Printer Friendly Version