{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

Well-functioning health systems require continuous availability of safe and affordable pharmaceuticals of assured quality. However, the high value of medicines, the size of public pharmaceutical budgets, and the complexity of the supply chain leave pharmaceutical systems vulnerable to corruption and mismanagement.

A civil society organisation (CSO) perspective on how UHC can be reached by 2030 Universal Health Coverage 2030 (UHC2030) MSH is the secretariat for the Civil Society Engagement Mechanism of UHC2030, a global movement to build stronger health systems for universal health coverage.

 {Photo credit: Tsion Issayas/MSH}Dr. Degu (far right) answers questions raised from the audience in a lively discussion during his presentation at the 13th Annual TB Research Conference in Addis Ababa.Photo credit: Tsion Issayas/MSH

The 13th Annual TB Research Conference in Ethiopia took place from 21-24 March in Addis Ababa. Organized by the Ethiopian Public Health Institute in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Health, the TB Research Conference is a forum designed to promote discussion and share innovations toward strengthening national response to the spread of tuberculosis. The conference was also part of the World TB Day celebrations that took place nationwide.

Participants of the EPN-SPS AMR regional workshop in Moshi, Tanzania. Photo credit: EPN

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when a microorganism becomes resistant to a drug that was originally effective for treating the infections it caused. It is one of the world’s most pressing global health threats and could erode progress made thus far in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, and many other infectious diseases.

Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH) role in combatting AMR was recently featured in the peer-reviewed journal, Global Public Health.

The article describes an approach used by the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program and its predecessors to build and strengthen coalitions to defeat AMR. SIAPS was implemented by MSH.

 {Photo Credit: Erik Schouten}A cholera patient recovers at a treatment center in Lilongwe District, Malawi.Photo Credit: Erik Schouten

Photos by Chisomo Mdalla, ONSE Health communications officer.

As the globe marks World Water Day on March 22, the Organized Network of Services for Everyone’s Health (ONSE) Activity has been supporting the Government of Malawi in responding to a months-long cholera epidemic.

ONSE, funded by the United States Agency for International Development and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), works in Malawi to reduce maternal, newborn, and child morbidity and mortality by focusing on health system strengthening; family planning and reproductive health; maternal, newborn, and child health; malaria; and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).

The first cases of cholera began appearing in Malawi in November 2017. As of March 20, a total of 827 cases had been reported in 13 of country’s 28 districts. Twenty-six deaths have been reported, according to the Epidemiology Unit of the Directorate of Preventive Health Services at the Ministry of Health. Cholera is an infectious bacterial disease that is often transmitted through poor hygiene and contaminated food and water.

 {Photo Credit: Diana Tumuhairwe}Mary Nkiinzi, a TRACK TB Community Linkage Facilitator for the Komamboga Health Centre in Uganda, checks on Nakawesi Harriet and her family during a home visit while Harriet and her mother complete treatment for multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB).Photo Credit: Diana Tumuhairwe

Tuberculosis remains the world’s leading infectious disease killer. Ending TB will require a comprehensive approach and targeted action, rapid innovation and proven interventions, bold leadership, and intensive community engagement.  

On this World TB Day, the global health community is calling for “Leaders for a TB-Free World” to work together, make history, and end TB once and for all.

 {Photo Credit: Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images} A council worker sprays disinfectant while cleaning up a market in Antananarivo, Madagascar, in October 2017 during an outbreak of plague.Photo Credit: Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images

This story was originally published by STAT News.

Ashley Arabasadi, Global Health Security Policy Adviser for Management Sciences for Health, describes the negative consequences of scaling back investments in CDC and USAID global health programs in this op-ed for STAT First Opinion.

The White House recently released a report outlining the progress and investments the U.S. has made to make the world safer from the threat of epidemics. But the key to epidemic preparedness and response is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, whose operations abroad will radically scale back due to looming funding cuts.

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