Stories

{Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH}Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH

Mothers are caregivers, educators, leaders and decision-makers. And they are frontline health workers and first responders, safeguarding their families' and communities' health and well-being. Mothers do everything for their families. Even when pregnant, they travel for days, on foot or by boat, to give birth at the nearest health facility. They cradle their sick children as they wait to be seen by a doctor in a crowded hospital. Mothers work multiple jobs and save their earnings so they can buy medicines, clothing, food, and school tuition and books for their children.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Attendees pose for a group photo at the launch ceremony for the updated Package of Essential Services.Photo credit: MSH

Even before the 2010 earthquake, Haiti’s public health system struggled to meet the growing demand for services by low-income families, and when disaster struck on January 12, 2010, the already-struggling health services around the country sustained extensive damage. Since then, the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP), with support from a range of donors and partners, has been rebuilding to meet its obligation to provide a timely, adequate, and efficient response to the population’s need for health services.

{Photo Credit: William Vasquez}Photo Credit: William Vasquez

April 25 is World Malaria Day, and this year the World Health Organization (WHO) is shining a spotlight on prevention, the cornerstone of malaria control efforts globally. While many countries with ongoing malaria transmission have reduced the burden of this disease significantly, the work is far from over. According to the WHO, in 2015 alone, there were an estimated 212 million new cases of malaria. That same year, malaria claimed the lives of almost half a million people worldwide, mainly young African children.

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