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 {Photo credit: Brian W. Simpson}The Global Fund’s Peter Sands speaking at a #WHA71 side event in Geneva on May 22, 2018.Photo credit: Brian W. Simpson

(This article was originally published in Global Health NOW.) by Brian Simpson Brian W. Simpson, editor-in-chief, Global Health NOW GENEVA – Global Fund executive director Peter Sands set an ominous challenge before experts at a Monday side event of the World Health Assembly: “The number of infectious disease outbreaks is going up,” Sands said. “This is not a problem that is going away as mankind gets bigger and richer. This is a problem the seems to be increasing in magnitude.”

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Half of children under the age of five in Madagascar are chronically malnourished: 24% suffer from moderate malnutrition and 26% from severe malnutrition, according to the 2012-2013 Millennium Development Goal Survey. Children in rural areas suffer disproportionately because they are often cut off from resources and information, and are typically far from health centers that support family health. Community health volunteers (CHVs) like Grancie Cicie help close the gap.

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

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