Stories

 {Photo Credit: Leonard Razafimandimby/AIM}Herilalaina with his healthy 4-month old childPhoto Credit: Leonard Razafimandimby/AIM

In remote communities of Madagascar, the distribution of chlorhexidine, an antiseptic and disinfectant, by community health volunteers (CHVs) is a major innovation that greatly contributes to the reduction of child mortality. This umbilical ointment prevents deadly infections and eases the healing process.

 {Photo Credit: Tsion Issayas/MSH}Aster Ammanuel (second from right) has more time to spend with her family now that the time needed for her visits to the hospital has decreased.Photo Credit: Tsion Issayas/MSH

Aster Amanuel Desalegn lives in Debre Markos, 190 miles from the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. She is a 70-year-old mother of four and grandmother of two. Her granddaughters, Emuye, 6, and Blen, 8, live with her. On a trip back from visiting family in Addis Ababa 20 years ago, Desalegn fell ill and went to the nearest health center for help. Doctors said her blood sugar level was critically high and she needed to start treatment right away. For the past 12 years, Desalegn has been taking insulin.

 {Photo Credit: Males Emmanuel/MSH}Baby Mary after two successful weeks on anti-TB treatmentPhoto Credit: Males Emmanuel/MSH

At nine months old, Mary Yeno had lived with TB for nearly half of her short life before being accurately diagnosed and treated. Mary’s mother, Flora Faida, carried the baby to three different health facilities without success. “She was coughing and had difficulty breathing. She stopped breastfeeding,” Faida said.

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