Stories

 {Photo credit: Stanley Stephanus for SIAPS Namibia}Pehovelo Ndahangoudja (left), a registered nurse documents feedback on CBART from Know your Status CASG member Julia Sheepo (2nd from right) and leader Marian Ndahafo Lilonga (right) at Ndamono clinic, Onandjokwe district.Photo credit: Stanley Stephanus for SIAPS Namibia

Health leaders in Namibia had a geographic challenge in delivering antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. The country is among the most affected by the HIV and AIDS epidemic in Southern Africa, with an estimated HIV prevalence among adults of 16.9% as of 2014. Yet, in a vast country in which two-thirds of the people live in sparsely settled rural sites, how could these leaders make sure essential ARV treatment is accessible to those in need?

Dr. W. Jallah receives the National Health Quality Strategy.

On May 10, 2018, the Liberian Ministry of Health (MOH), with support from the USAID Collaborative Support for Health (CSH) Program, launched the National Health Quality Strategy (NHQS). The goal of the strategy is to improve the health system’s ability to provide safe and high-quality health services. It aims to restore public trust in the system through improved leadership, governance, accountability and community engagement. The MOH has prioritized this initiative as shown by its inclusion in the investment plan for building a resilient health system for 2015-2021.

{Photo credit: MSH}Hon. Dr. Riek Gai Kok (Minister of Health, Republic of South Sudan), Colin Gilmartin (MSH), Alfred Driwale (MSH Consultant), and Chair of the Health Parliamentary Committee of the Republic of South Sudan.Photo credit: MSH

South Sudan faces extraordinary challenges to build and strengthen its health system to meet the basic health needs of its people. After decades of civil war, the country faces a critical shortage of trained health personnel,[1] limited access[2] to essential health services,[3] and consequently experiences some of the worst health indicators globally. The majority of childhood deaths are due to preventable causes such as diarrhea, malaria, and pneumonia while an estimated one in seven women die due to pregnancy related complications.[4]

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