Uganda Launches Accredited Drug Shops in Kibaale

On November 12, 2009, Uganda’s Honorable Minister of Health, Dr. Stephen Malinga, officially launched the opening of Accredited Drug Shops (ADS) in Kibaale district in front of a crowd of about 500 people, including national and local government officials; representatives from the Pharmaceutical Society of Uganda; who collaborated on the ADS implementation; newly accredited ADS attendants and owners, who had completed a comprehensive training on drug dispensing regulations; and community members.

Initiatives like the Accredited Drug Shop program that increase the number of drug sellers who are trained and accredited and who will dispense common medicines rationally, have a potential to affect many people in this country and could help curtail the spread of antimicrobial resistance—a critical issue with introducing any new medicine...

Dr. Stephan Malinga, Minister of Health

With funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, EADSI builds on MSH’s collaboration with the government of Tanzania to develop that country’s successful accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO) program. In early 2008, EADSI started working with Uganda’s Ministry of Health and the National Drug Authority to develop a plan to adapt and replicate the ADDO model in Uganda and demonstrate the adapted model in Kibaale district. The goal of the private-sector drugseller initiative in Uganda is to increase access to quality essential medicines and pharmaceutical services in underserved areas through the accreditation of private drug sellers and shops coupled with incentives to promote profitability and long&;term sustainability.

EADSI, in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Society of Uganda, will collect endline data next fall. The evaluation will compare the quality of ADS products and services in Kibaale with unaccredited drug shops in Mpigi as well as compare baseline and endline results—before and after the ADS intervention. EADSI will present the results at a regional conference in early 2011.

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