Press Room

Medford, Massachusetts – Dr. Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH, President and CEO of Management Sciences for Health (MSH), an international nonprofit dedicated to saving lives by building strong health systems in some of the world’s poorest communities, has announced his decision to step down and transition into a new role of MSH Senior Fellow once a successor is appointed. Dr.

MSH staffers Melissa Wanda Kirowo and Kate Cho have been nominated for 120Under40: The New Generation of Family Planning Leaders.

MSH staffers Melissa Wanda Kirowo (Kenya) and Kate Cho (Arlington, Virginia) were nominated for the global 120 Under 40 Project by family planning colleagues for their substantial contributions to reproductive health at the national or local level. According to the 120 Under 40 website, an anonymous colleague nominated Kate, and colleagues from PATH, Family Health Options Kenya, and the Kenya Centre for the Study of Adolescence nominated Melissa.

Nairobi, Kenya — General Electric today marked another step in the development of sustainable healthcare in Kenya, with the inauguration of the brand new $13 million GE Healthcare Skills and Training Institute, an education facility for healthcare professionals. The centre was inaugurated in the presence of Dr Cleopa Mailu, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Health for Kenya (or designate) and Mr. John Flannery, President & CEO of GE Healthcare, in Nairobi.

 {Photo credit: Ministry of Health of the Republic of Gabon}First Deputy Prime Minister of Gabon, Paul Biyoghe Mba (right), and MSH Executive Vice President, Paul Auxila (left), at the launch of PAPNDS.Photo credit: Ministry of Health of the Republic of Gabon

On Friday, April 8, the Gabon Ministry of Health launched a technical assistance agreement with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) that will help reform Gabon’s health sector, with a particular focus on improving maternal and child health outcomes.

{Photo credit: Lucian Coman | Dreamstime.com}Photo credit: Lucian Coman | Dreamstime.com

The No More Epidemics Call to Action has been updated, providing detailed recommendations for governments and other stakeholders on how to address this situation. Outbreaks of infectious disease could happen anywhere, at any time. Putting in place measures to prevent outbreaks from becoming epidemics—and responding rapidly when they do happen—can reduce the human and economic impacts. Still, the international community finds itself struggling to contain outbreaks when they occur. Zika and Ebola are just the latest examples.

After Highly Successful Film on HIV, Producers Come Together to Engage Millions in sub-Saharan Africa around Tuberculosis

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