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{Photo Credit: Michael Paydos/MSH}Photo Credit: Michael Paydos/MSH

Tuberculosis is one of the top causes of death globally. In many of the countries most affected by this disease, drug sellers—also known as private pharmacies—are the first point of contact for people seeking health care. By some estimates, about 50 percent of TB patients’ first contact with the health system is from a private pharmacy.

'Good Morning Namibia' interviewed MSH Country Director Evans Sagwa about the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) project, funded by USAID and implemented by MSH. In the interview, Sagwa spoke about the importance of strong pharmaceutical systems and SIAPS' impact on the country. Among other topics, Sagwa discussed SIAPS' work to improve the availability and accessibility of medicines, fight against HIV and AIDS, and strengthen the health system in Namibia.

 {Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Nurses from Nseke discuss collected data during their monthly monitoring meetingPhoto Credit: MSH Staff

In the vast, logistically challenging Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), health data are often incomplete, unreliable, or submitted too late to be of use to public health authorities. Health data for the Nseke health area (Kanzenze health zone) seemed at odds with what the health zone management team actually saw on monitoring and supervisory visits. On paper, it looked like the local health facilities were performing well. But community feedback and verification told a different story.

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