{Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla}Inspecting the water system at Mitundu Rural Hospital.Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla

When a blackout occurred after Pilirani Kabango ended her shift one September evening in 2017, she did not anticipate any unusual consequences. Power outages during this time of year are not uncommon in Malawi, and despite high temperatures and the fact that the rivers supporting electricity generation were drying up, demand for power continues. The three water tanks at Lilongwe’s Mitundu Rural Hospital, where Pilirani works as a nursing supervisor—among the biggest rural public hospitals in Malawi—had a combined capacity of 30,000 liters.

{Photo Credit: Julienne Ahua/MSH}Dr Kouadio (with the stethoscope) and her pediatric team at Yamoussoukro Regional Hospital Center.Photo Credit: Julienne Ahua/MSH

"My passion for babies was born from personal experience. I lost my parents at a very early age,” recalled Dr. Kouamé Kouadio, Head of the Pediatric Department at the Regional Hospital Center of Yamoussoukro, the administrative and political capital of Côte d'Ivoire.

{Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff/USAID Angola} Eva Hadi Dos Santos, Community Counselor, and Suzeth de Moráis António, Patient Assistant Facilitator, from Viana Health Center, Luanda, Angola.Photo Credit: Health for All Project Staff/USAID Angola

It happened on July 10, 2017, at the Viana Health Center, one of the nine health facilities supported by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Luanda, Angola. Maria, a young mother, brought in her 15 month-old child, seeking care for severe malnutrition. In accordance with clinical guidelines, the child was tested for HIV by the Counseling and Testing Service and was identified as HIV positive. Immediately, Maria was also tested and was found to be HIV positive as well.


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