{Photo Credit: Denise Museminali}Amina, a community health worker, urged Jean Cyiza to take his son Daniel to the Ntoma Health Center for nutritional support after she diagnosed him as severely malnourished.Photo Credit: Denise Museminali

When Daniel was just 11 months old, his mother suddenly passed away from illness. Without her, he was no longer able to breastfeed and gradually became malnourished. In Rwanda, 38 percent of children under five years old experience chronic malnutrition, or stunting.[i] Stunted children tend to perform poorly in school and are less likely to become productive adults In fact, the World Bank Group estimates that malnourished children are at risk of losing 10 percent of their lifetime earning potential.[ii]

{Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff}Dr. Gabriel Timothé, the Director-General of the MSPP, during the distribution of the PES to the departmental health directors.Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff

In Haiti, it is a core function of the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP)—through its Directorate of Health Service Organization (Direction d’Organisation des services de la santé, DOSS)—to define the set of health services to which every Haitian must have access and to enable and equip health providers and facilities to effectively, equitably, and accountably provide those services.

{Photo Credit: Gladys Lavien}Midwife Amelia G. Mulbah.Photo Credit: Gladys Lavien

Amelia G. Mulbah, 33, is a newly trained midwife working in a remote region of Liberia. She received a scholarship through the USAID Collaborative Support for Health (CSH) Program and graduated from nursing school in December 2016. After passing the state board test, she became a registered midwife and was deployed for two years at the Lutheran Referral Hospital in northwestern Lofa County.


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