{Photo Credit: Henry Nyaka}Grace Mathunda.Photo Credit: Henry Nyaka

At the time that Grace Mathunda started to fall ill, she also grew increasingly concerned over the poor health of her second child. Eventually he became so weak that he stopped going to school. When Mathunda, 32, became pregnant again, she went to Makhetha Health Center in Blantyre, Malawi, where she was tested for HIV. As with over 30 percent of people living with HIV in the country, Mathunda was unaware of her status.[1] She tested positive.

{Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira}Mama Mawa credits the new iCCM site with saving her children's lives.Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira

Married with two children, Mama Mawa lives in Kalamba, a remote village of 900 people in the health zone of Kitutu, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Kalamba experienced four infant deaths from preventable diseases in the three-month period from March 2016 to May 2016. Yet, that was before the installation of an integrated community case management (iCCM) site in the village, under the auspices of the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus).

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina}Lynda Razafiharilalao, a Malagasy community health volunteer, shows various modules of the mHealth app to a fellow volunteer.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

In rural areas of Madagascar, community health volunteers (CHVs) are instrumental in improving maternal and child health services. Their activities include raising awareness on healthy behaviors, child growth monitoring, family planning counseling and services, and treatment of simple illnesses, such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria. As CHVs are part of Madagascar’s health system, their activity reports feed into the national health information system.


Printer Friendly Version