Narcisse Embeke, with his wife and two children. (Courtesy of Narcisse Embeke/MSH)Narcisse Embeke, with his wife and two children. (Courtesy of Narcisse Embeke/MSH)

"My mother taught me that I had to help others, because many children my age were dying." Narcisse Naia Embeke, 41, comes from a small community in South Ubangi in northwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). When he was young, a measles outbreak hit his village almost every year between October and March and in those months, he remembered, an average of eight children died every day. Childhood death from the disease became so common that there was a saying, Narcisse remembered: "Until measles has passed, don't count your children."

 {Photo credit: Berhan Teklehaimanot/MSH}HEAL TB has trained 471 district TB focal persons on identification and management of TB in children in the Amhara and Oromia regions of Ethiopia.Photo credit: Berhan Teklehaimanot/MSH

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that up to 80,000 children die from tuberculosis (TB) each year and that children account for over half a million new cases annually. Unfortunately, global figures likely underestimate the burden of childhood TB worldwide due to missed diagnosis, causing TB in children to be a ‘’hidden epidemic.”

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

In Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), childbearing is too often fatal for mothers as well as their newborns. The USAID-funded Integrated Health Project (IHP) is improving the odds for mothers and newborns by training health care providers with a package of low-cost, high-impact services, throughout 78 health zones in four provinces.


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