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A health worker in Liberia washes his hands.Photo credit: Cindy Shiner/MSH

Following a 13-year civil war, Liberia's health system was decimated. Clinics had been looted and destroyed, many health workers had left the country, and the Ministry of Health barely existed. Although conditions have improved considerably over the past decade, much work remains to be able to deliver consistent, quality services to Liberia's four million people and to be able to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. 

 {<a href="http://siapsprogram.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Guatemala_CV_Afiche_FINAL_R1.pdf">USAID SIAPS</a>}Identifying, Treating, and Preventing Malaria: a poster for community volunteersUSAID SIAPS

In Guatemala, a network of community volunteers who diagnose and treat malaria in their communities are mainstays of the Ministry of Health’s malaria strategy to ensure timely access to appropriate treatment, a key strategy to eliminate malaria. However, an assessment identified weaknesses in the volunteers’ management of antimalarials and diagnostic supplies.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Kasifa Mugala, 34, started feeling ill while she was pregnant, and started ART after referral for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. “I am very happy. I gave birth to a healthy baby who is now turning one year old,” she said. “I did not know that I would ever be fine. I am grateful to our village health team.”Photo credit: MSH staff

Esther Nyende, 45, is a member of her village health team and a community leader in Uganda’s eastern Pallisa District. Nyende alone has referred 20 clients who are now receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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