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{Photo credit: Henry Nyaka}Malawian Minister of Health and Population Atupele Muluzi and US Ambassador Virginia Palmer cut the ribbon to officially open the Umodzi Family Center, an HIV and tuberculosis clinic at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, on World AIDS Day.Photo credit: Henry Nyaka

The Umodzi Family Center, an HIV and tuberculosis clinic at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, officially opened on World AIDS Day with the support of Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Speaking at the opening ceremony, Minister of Health and Population Atupele Muluzi said the time had come for the southern region to have a referral HIV center. “I have to thank all stakeholders and development partners, more especially the United States, for the collaboration in making this project a success,” said Muluzi.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Marian Wentworth visits the Soroti Regional Referral Hospital in Mbale, Uganda.Photo credit: Warren Zelman

MSH CEO Marian Wentworth was interviewed by Global Health NOW. Part 2 of the interview was published today. When Marian Wentworth took charge of Management Sciences for Health in March, the global health NGO had been through a rough few years. It had shed a third of its workforce after some large contracts ended. Her top priority was making sure MSH was "was right sized or healed from its right sizing," Wentworth says. Now, she says, “I see a lot of things actually swinging into MSH's sweet spot. I'm really optimistic for MSH's future.”

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