medicines

Bedaquiline (BDQ) has been recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) since 2013, but experience using the drug in high-burden, lower-income countries is limited and case studies are needed. Swaziland started using BDQ under national TB programme conditions in 2015 in four pilot sites. As of 1 December 2016, 93 patients had been initiated on BDQ, i.e., 19% of MDR-TB patients treated in the country. Swaziland has developed a systematic and efficient model for BDQ introduction in collaboration with several partners. This model is also being used to introduce other innovations and can serve as an example for other countries facing similar challenges.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of a select group of medicines sold in accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDOs) and pharmacies in different regions of Tanzania as part of an in-depth cross-sectional assessment of community access to medicines and community use of medicines. We collected 242 samples of amoxicillin trihydrate, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu), co-trimoxazole, ergometrine maleate, paracetamol, and quinine from selected ADDOs and pharmacies in Mbeya, Morogoro, Singida, and Tanga regions. The analysis included physical examination and testing with validated analytical techniques. The physical examination of samples revealed no defects in the solid and oral liquid dosage forms, but unusual discoloration in an injectable solution, ergometrine maleate. Over 90% of the medicines sold in ADDOs and pharmacies met quality standards. Policy makers need to reconsider ergometrine maleate’s place on the list of medicines that ADDOs are allowed to dispense, by either substituting a more temperature-stable therapeutically equivalent product or requiring those sites to have refrigerators, which is not a feasible option for rural Tanzania.

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