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One of many billboards erected in Juba, South Sudan, in anticipation of Independence day on July 9th, 2011 (Erin Polich/MSH)

MSH, leader of the the USAID-funded Sudan Health Transformation Project- II, is proud to congratulate South Sudan on their independence. The following blog post discusses the impact that independence will have on South Sudan’s health system and the challenges that still lie ahead.

Sudan Health Transformation Project II (SHTP-II) Chief of Party John Rumunu comments on what independence means for health in South Sudan. SHTP-II is led Management Sciences for Health and funded by USAID.

Thirty years ago, we learned of a disease that began with a few cases and quickly transformed into an epidemic the world had not seen before. We were not exactly sure what it was, how it was spread, or how to care for people who had it. HIV & AIDS has had a dramatic impact on the world – and especially on people in low and middle income countries. Over the past 30 years, AIDS programming responses have changed due to developments in public health science, politics, economics, and organizational capacity.

As we look through the past thirty years, there have been three distinct generations of AIDS responses and programming. In the 1980s, what we refer to as the Zero Generation, there was no effective response. Little was known and little was done about HIV & AIDS. Prevention was rudimentary, treatment nonexistent, and funding limited.

By 1990, the epidemic was already showing signs of spiraling out of control. The First-Generation programs were characterized by limited funding, a focus on prevention, continued denial in many parts of the world, and—as before— essentially no treatment in low- and middle-income countries.

It was an exciting and insightful week of discussions at this month’s Global Health Council meeting on how to address the drastically growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cancers, diabetes, and heart and lung disease, in advance of the UN High Level Summit on NCDs in September. Speakers made a strong case for including NCDs as a priority on the global health agenda. The intertwining of these diseases with communicable diseases such as HIV, TB and malaria are striking. Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health described the commonalities:

Discovering MSH blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as MSH celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on MSH’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on MSH’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with MSH staff.

The theme of this year’s Global Health Council annual conference was Securing a Healthier Future in a Changing World. As populations are shifting, so are their health priorities. Increasing urbanization has led to more people living in and around cities, creating a series of problems that are new to public health professionals. Nutritional challenges, the need for improved water and sanitation infrastructure, and addressing the issue of unregulated health care providers are all problems facing governments, ministries, NGOs, donors, and populations. In addition, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, and mental illness, are adding a new strain to many already resource constrained health systems. Of course, immunization, malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, and maternal death are all still very serious challenges in many of these systems and remain key priorities.

Discovering MSH blog series graphicOver the next couple of months, as MSH celebrates it's 40th anniversary, reporter John Donnelly and photographer Dominic Chavez will be traveling to several countries to report on MSH’s work in the field. The stories will go into a book due out in the fall on MSH’s 40 years in global health. This blog entry is a post from the road, to give a flavor of their experiences with MSH staff.LILONGWE, Malawi – The problem with writing about improvements in Malawi’s health system is focus. There are multiple directions to explore: extending family planning into rural communities, training HIV counselors, the rapid scale-up of HIV treatment, integrating TB services more into the mainstream of health care. At the US Agency for International Development (USAID) mission here, Dr.

That point was made often by the Honorable Dr. Walter T. Gwenigale, Minister of Health and Social Welfare of the Republic of Liberia (also widely known as Dr. G in Liberia) at a conference, co-sponsored by MSH on June 9 and 10 at the US Institute of Peace. The event, Health in Post-Conflict and Fragile States: Challenges for the Next Decade was organized by Leonard Rubenstein, Chair of the USIP Health and Peacebuilding Working Group, and Stephen Commins, of International Medical Corps.

The two-day discussion explored the unique characteristics of health service delivery in fragile and conflict-affected states, making the point that “yes, it can be done,” but there is still a long way to go to get it right and find the balance between short-term interventions and long-term development. Speakers shared lessons learned in reconstructing health systems, especially in Afghanistan and Southern Sudan. They also took a look at human rights, governance, and vulnerable populations, particularly women. Dr. Gwenigale and Deputy Administrator of USAID, Ambassador Donald K. Steinberg provided keynotes.

Serafina Sabino, a Medical Assistant in Wau, South Sudan (© Dr. Edward Luka)

Thousands of civilians fled from Abyei following the crisis in May, when northern forces took control over the town. The United Nations Office for Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) reports 50,600 people displaced from Abyei town are verified and registered and estimates the full number to be about 84,000 people. Most of the Internally displaced persons (IDPs) fled to nearby Northern Bahr el Ghazal and Warrap States, where many humanitarian agencies are providing assistance in high displacement areas like Agok, Turalei, and Wunrock. However, many IDPs are arriving in Wau town, several hundred kilometers south of Abyei.

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